Wednesday May 18, 2011

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.


Tuesday May 17, 2011

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

Film:


Friday May 13th & Monday May 16th, 2011

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CST (California Standards Test)
Test will be administered in your 2nd period class

Mr. Marzo's Room 404 English II (CP) Students Period 2

Friday May 13th Testing Block Period 1

7:45 – 9AM CST Language Arts (Session 1), Grades 9, 10, 11

9:00 – 9:10 AM Break

9:10 – 11:00 AM CST Language Arts (Session 2), Grades 9, 10, 11

11:00 – 11:40 AM Lunch


Friday May 13th Testing Block Period 2

11:45 – 1:45 PM CST Science – END OF COURSE, Grades 9, 10, 11
(Physics, Chemistry, Biology) – All students without a testable science class will be dismissed.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday May 16th Testing Block Period 1

7:45 – 9AM CST Mathematics (Session 1), Grades 9, 10, 11

9:00 – 9:10 AM Break

9:10 – 11:10 AMCST Mathematics (Session 2), Grades 9, 10, 11

10:40 – 11:10 AM EAP test - Juniors ONLY

11:10 – 11:40 AM LUNCH

Monday May 16th Testing Block Period 2

11:45 – 1:45   CST Social Science, Grades 10, 11 (9th graders except those in
                           MUN World History will be dismissed during this time.

                           10th graders in Modern History MUN will be dismissed during this time)


Thursday May 12, 2011
"Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him."

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.











REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4- Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Wednesday May 11, 2011

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.


HAND IN Questions from Literature Book Page 832 Q 1-4 and 6



CLASSWORK

I. Continue Reviewing J.C. Act 3 Scenes 1 & 2

II. Read Julius Caesar Act III, Scene 3


III. Take Notes and add to Character Chart

Characters:

Metellus Cimber: The member of the conspiracy who approaches Caesar with his plea for a pardon for his brother, Publius Cimber, in order to get the conspirators close enough to Caesar to kill him.

Artemidorus: A sophist and loyal subject of Caesar who tries to warn him of the plot with a scroll he prepares.

Cinna: A member of the conspiracy.

Cinna the poet: A poet who is chased by Roman plebeians because he has the same name as the conspirator.

A Soothsayer: Warns Caesar--unheeded--to be aware of the ides of March.

Octavius Caesar:  He is the adopted son and heir of Julius Caesar and he forms part of the second Triumvirate with Mark Antony and Lepidus. He does not have the military prowess of Julius Caesar or Mark Antony and Brutus defeats his army at Philippi.  He does not die with his troops and joins Mark Antony in their victorious battle over Cassius and Brutus.

Notes:

The title Dictator angered members of the Senate, who felt this challenged the very republic Caesar had created. Member of his Senate eventually murdered him famously on March 15th, which is referred to as the "Ides of March". After his assassination, he was even given the title Divus ("god") because he was so loved by the public. Caesar was stabbed 23 times.

When Brutus stabbed him Caesar said "Et tu Brute?

Cry, 'Havoc!' and let slip the dogs of war. (3.1.268) - Marc Antony

REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Tuesday May 10, 2011
            The Death of Julius Caesar

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesarbook with you to class today.








CLASSWORK

I. Read Julius Caesar Page 87 - 109 Act 3 Scene 1 - Follow along with CD

II. Review
Julius Caesar Act III Scene 1

III. Film Clips - The Death of Julius Caesar


HOMEWORK

I. Questions from Literature Book Page 832 Q 1-4 and 6

REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4- Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Monday May 9, 2011

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.







REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4- Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


                          Thursday May 5 & Friday May 6, 2011
                   Block Schedule - Periods 1, 3 (Thur) & 2 (Fri)

          Brutus and Portia

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.








CLASSWORK

I. Journal - Title: Difficult Decision - Write ½ page - DUE TODAY!

What was the most difficult decision you have ever had to make in your life? Why was it difficult?

In your journal, describe how you arrived at the decision. Did you discuss it with friends or relatives?

Do you feel that you made the right decision, or would you change it if you could?

Did Brutus’ decision involve any of the same factors that affected your decision? If so, what factors?

Do you think that he made the right choice?



II. Personal Response Write 1 paragraph- DUE TODAY!  ( Respond on same sheet of paper)

What are your feelings toward Caesar at this point in the play?

 
III. READ BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Did You Know?

Marcus Brutus claimed to have descended from the founder of the Roman Republic. In 509 B.C., Lucius

Junius Brutus led a revolt against Tarquinius Superbus, Rome’s seventh king. Ancient historians describe

Tarquinius as a tyrant who killed many senators. Brutus supposedly expelled him and his family after

Tarquinius’s son took advantage of a noblewoman. Brutus, one of the first consuls elected, made the

Roman people swear never to accept another king. Much of the story may be legend, but it does reflect

the Romans’ long-standing dislike of kings. Even the emperors avoided using the title.

IV. READ Julius Caesar  Act II  Scenes 2, 3 and 4  Pages
         (Read together in class. Sign up for parts on white board)


V. Analyzing Literature

Recall and Interpret - Questions due today at the end of the period!

1. How does Brutus justify the plot against Caesar? What does this justification suggest

about Brutus’s values?

2. Why does Brutus want to spare Antony’s life? What is his opinion of Antony?

3. How does Portia convince Brutus to disclose his secret to her? What is your impression

of their relationship?

4. Why is Calphurnia afraid to let Caesar go to the Senate House? Does Caesar seem to

share her fear? Explain.

5. What arguments does Decius make to change Caesar’s mind? Which of Caesar’s personality

traits make him vulnerable to Decius’s arguments?

Evaluate and Connect

6. Which of the two appears to have the better understanding of human nature, Brutus or

Cassius? Explain.

7. Which three events in Act 2 serve to increase the level of suspense in the play? How?


HOMEWORK  - DUE MONDAY May 9th


I. Literature and Writing

Journal - Title: Behind Every Great Man - Write 1/2 Page


Shakespeare introduces Portia and Calphurnia in Act 2. How are these two women alike?

How are they different? What do their relationships with their husbands reveal about Brutus

and Caesar? Write one half page comparing and contrasting these two women’s


relationships  with their husbands.


II. FOCUS ACTIVITY

What is the most moving formal speech you have ever heard or read? Why did it make a lasting impression?

Write one paragraph describing the speech and explaining why it made such an impression on you.

( Respond on same sheet of paper)



REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html



Wednesday May 4, 2011

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* Students you need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

Hand in JULIUS CAESAR STUDY
QUESTIONS ACT II SCENE 1  DUE  TODAY





CLASSWORK

I. J.C. ACT II, Scene 1 -  Imagery - Due today at the end of class

Imagery is language that stirs up one or all of the five senses: seeing, hearing, tasting,
smelling, or touching. When Brutus contemplates Caesar and the crown, he uses an
interesting metaphor to express his feelings. This activity provides insight into Brutus’s
point of view and demonstrates how imagery enhances writing.


1. Read this quote from Brutus: “It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; / And that
craves wary walking. Crown him?—that;— / And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, /
That at his will he may do danger with.”

2. What are the qualities of an adder?

3. Assume Caesar had qualities of an adder. Clearly, Brutus is not suggesting Caesar would
bite people. What do you think Brutus means? How might these qualities demonstrate
themselves in Caesar’s leadership?
-------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Find another instance of imagery in Act II, Scene I, and copy it here:

2. What picture is being used here?

3. Explain whether or not you think this was a good choice of imagery on Shakespeare’s
part. What does it do for the play?


REMINDERS

* Julius Caesar Theme ParkProject - 50 points - Due Monday, June 6, 2011

*Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html




Tuesday May 3, 2011

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CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK


I. READ JULIUS CAESAR ACT II, SCENE I.  Pages 47 - 71 - Follow along with CD



II. JULIUS CAESAR STUDY QUESTIONS ACT II SCENE 1 - HOMEWORK - DUE  Wednesday 5/4/11

ACT II, SCENE I.

1. What question is Brutus pondering at the opening of the scene? To what decision does Brutus come in his orchard? Why?
 
2. For what information does Brutus want Lucius to look at a calendar?

     What is the significance of what Lucius finds? What does Lucius give to Brutus in Scene I?

3. Why do the conspirators want Cicero to join them?


4. Why does Brutus reject Cicero and is against killing Mark Antony?
     What is Cassius's reaction and what does this show about his and Brutus's relationship?
     Why doesn't Brutus want to swear an oath with the conspirators?

5. What do the conspirators plan to do the next day?

6. Why did Brutus say, "Render me worthy of this noble wife!"?
 
7. How does Decius say he will make sure that Caesar will come to the Capitol?


8. What has Portia done to show Brutus that she is worthy of knowing his secrets?


III. REVIEW Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay  and Julius Caesar Theme Park Project

Julius Caesar Persuasive Essay (100 Points) - DUE WEDNESDAY JUNE 8, 2011
(5-Paragraph Essay, Typed, Double Spaced, #12 Arial Font, 1" Margins)

Just as Brutus attempted to use the idea that the end justifies the means to rationalize his decision to kill Caesar, some people today use the same argument to justify acts of war, violent protest, or terrorism. In a well organized essay, defend, challenge, or qualify the validity of this argument. Use examples from your reading, observation, and/or experience to support your position.

ESSAY RUBRIC

Top Scores
9-8
93-100 points
· These are well-written papers which respond fully to the question asked.
· The best papers show a full understanding of the issues and support their points with appropriate textual
evidence and examples.
· Writers of these essays demonstrate stylistic maturity by an effective command of sentence structure, diction,
and organization.
· The writing need not be without flaws, but it should reveal the writer’s ability to choose from and control a
wide range of elements of effective writing.

Upper Scores
7-6
92-83 points
· These essays also respond correctly to the questions asked but do so less fully or less effectively than the
essays in the top range.
· Their discussion may be less thorough and less specific.
· These essays are well-written in an appropriate style but reveal less maturity than the top papers.
· They do make use of textual evidence to support their points.
· Some lapses in diction or syntax may appear, but the writing demonstrates sufficient control over the
elements of composition to present the writer’s ideas clearly.

Middle Score
5
82-77 points
· These essays respond to the question, but the comments may be simplistic or imprecise; they may be overly
generalized, vague, or inadequately supported.
· These essays are adequately written, but may demonstrate inconsistent control over the elements of
composition.
· Organization is attempted, but it may not be fully realized or particularly effective.

Lower Scores
4-3
76-70 points
· These essays attempt to deal with the question, but do so either inaccurately or without support or specific
evidence.
· They may show some misunderstanding or omit pertinent analysis.
· The writing can convey the writer’s ideas, but it reveals weak control over diction, syntax, organization.
· These essays may contain excessive and distracting spelling and grammatical errors.
· Statements are seldom supported with specific or persuasive evidence, or inappropriately lengthy quotations
may replace discussion and analysis.

Lowest Scores
2-1
69-60 points
· These essays fail to respond adequately to the question.
· They may reveal misunderstanding or may distort the interpretation.
· They compound the problems of the Lower Score papers.
· Often poorly written on several counts, these essays may contain many distracting errors in grammar and
mechanics.
· Generally these essays are unacceptably brief or poorly written.
· Although some attempts to answer the question may be indicated, the writer’s view has little clarity and only
slight, if any, evidence in its support.


Julius Caesar Theme Park Project - 50 points - Due Monday June 6th, 2011 

Picture
Shakespeare has hit the big time.  His estate is allowing you, the theme park developer, to create a theme park based on one of his most famous plays, Julius Caesar.  The Romeo and Juliet theme park has been such a success, it only seems natural to now open a second theme park based on a different play.

As the developer, you must make important decisions regarding the attractions, cost, requirements, and many other items.  You are also in charge of promoting this theme park.

Your job as the developer will come in steps.  First, you need to decide the following:







1.  What is the name of the theme park?

2.  What main attractions will you have? 

A good theme park would have 5 major attractions to advertise.


3.  Where is the theme park located? 

4.  What is the cost of admission? 

5.  What restaurants and other amenities are available?

6.  You may choose to add other information at your discretion. 
     After all, you are the developer!


Next, you must design a brochure for your theme park.  The brochure must be neatly designed and it must relay all information outlined above.  Make sure to include a Map of your theme park.
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Monday May 2, 2011

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* Students bring your "JC Book” with you
   to class, Monday 5/2 through Thurs. 5/6









*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. REVIEW HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT for JC ACT I.   DUE TUESDAY May 3, 2011

ACT I Reading and Study Guide

I. LITERARY TERMS: Be able to define each term and apply each term to the play.

    blank verse :

              List characters who speak in verse:

    prose:

            List characters who speak in prose:

 
 **What possible reason do some characters speak in prose and some speak in verse?

    tragedy:

 
    exposition:
 

      Explain how this Act serves as the exposition to the play.

 
    pun:

        Example from Act I, Scene 1:

 
    hyperbole:

        Example from Act I, Scene 1:

 
     conflict:

 

            External:           1. _______________ vs. ________________

 

                                    2. _______________ vs. ________________

 

                                    3. _______________ vs. ________________

 

            Internal:            4. ________________ vs. ________________

   

soliloquy :

 

            Example:

 

    monologue:

 

      Example:

 

     metaphor

 

            Example:

 
    simile:

 
            Example:



II. READ from Julius Caesar ACT II Scenes 1 - 4

(Students sign up for parts. Read as much as you can get through together in class)



REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html




Friday April 29, 2011

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Hand In JC Vocabulary 1 Sentences







CLASSWORK


I. Take JC Vocabulary 1  Quiz


II. Give Instructions for  Julius Caesar: ACT I Reading and Study Guide Assignment - Due Tues. May 3rd

LITERARY TERMS: Be able to define each term and apply each term to the play.

  1. blank verse    List characters who speak in verse:

         prose:             List characters who speak in prose:

  
**What possible reason do some characters speak in prose and some speak in verse?

 
  1. tragedy:
 

  1. exposition:
      Explain how this Act serves as the exposition to the play.

 


  1. pun:
      Example from Act I, Scene 1:

  
  1. hyperbole:
      Example from Act I, Scene 1:

    
  1. conflict:
            External:           1. _______________ vs. ________________

                                    2. _______________ vs. ________________

                                    3. _______________ vs. ________________

            Internal:            4. ________________ vs. ________________

 

  1. soliloquy :
            Example:

  

  1. monologue:
      Example:

 

 
  1. metaphor
            Example:

  

  1. simile:
            Example:

HOMEWORK

I. Julius Caesar: ACT I Reading and Study Guide Assignment - Due Tues. May 3rd

  REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html




Thursday, April 28, 2011

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* Students you do not need to bring your
  Julius Caesar book with you to class today.











CLASSWORK

I. Watch Films - Decisive Battles - Pharsalus 48 BC (Caesar vs Pompey) Part 2
     and part of  Julius Caesar Film: Pompey  in  Alexandria, Egypt


HOMEWORK

I. VOCABULARY - WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Fri. 04/29/11
     QUIZ over all 20 words - Friday 04/29/11  - See Mon. 4/25 for list of words and definitions


REMINDERS


* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Wednesday April 27, 2011

Picture

Please bring your Julius Caesar
book with you to class today.



Hand In - Literature Book Questions Page 779
Reading Check & Interpretations 1 - 13 - Due Today
    





CLASSWORK

I. READ- Julius Caesar Act I Scene 3  Pages   -   
     (What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

     Sign up on whiteboard to read for the following Characters:

Act I Scene 3:        Narrator -    Cicero -  Cinna -    Cassius -    Casca-   



II. Watch Film - Decisive Battles - Pharsalus 48 BC (Caesar vs Pompey) Part 1

Pompey and much of the Roman Senate fled Italy in 48 BC to prepare an army. Caesar, lacking a fleet of ships, solidified his control over the western Mediterranean — Spain specifically — before assembling ships to follow Pompey. Pompey had a large fleet, as well as much support from all Roman provinces and client states east of Italy. Caesar, however, managed to cross the Adriatic in the winter, with Mark Antony following a little later because Caesar lacked sufficient ships. Although Pompey had a larger army, he recognized that Caesar's troops were more experienced, and could prove victorious in a pitched battle.  An indecisive winter of blockade and siege followed.

Pompey eventually confronted Caesar near Pharsalus. Caesar began the battle causing Pompey's entire cavalry to fall into disorder. Caesar's army was able to get behind and attack Pompey's army from the rear. The remaining Pompeiian soldiers fled and soon the main battle was done. Pompey fled with a very small retinue, claiming that he had been betrayed. Caesar had won his greatest victory, having lost only about 200 soldiers and 30 centurions. Pompey fled from Pharsalus to Egypt, where he was assassinated on the order of Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII. Interestingly enough, Ptolemy XIII sent Pompey's head to Caesar in an effort to win his favor, but Caesar was not pleased about receiving the head of his son-in-law and good friend in a box. It was even said that Caesar cried as he had planned on pardoning those politicians who had opposed him.


HOMEWORK

I. VOCABULARY - WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Fri. 04/29/11
       QUIZ over all 20 words - Friday 04/29/11  - See Mon. 4/25 for list of words and definitions



REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Tuesday April 26, 2011
      Brutus & Cassius

Picture


Please bring your Julius Caesar
book with you to class today.







CLASSWORK

I. READ - Julius Caesar Act I Scene 2 Pages   -   
     (What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

     Sign up on whiteboard to read for the following characters:


Act I Scene 2:      Brutus -              Calphurnia-        Antony-      Caesar  - 

                                                    Narrator -      Soothsayer -        Cassius -     Casca-                                         
                                   

HOMEWORK


I. Literature Book Page 779 - Reading Check & Interpretations
     Answer Questions 1 - 13 - Due Wednesday April 27, 2011


II. VOCABULARY - WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Fri. 04/29/11
       QUIZ over all 20 words - Friday 04/29/11  - See Mon. 4/25 for list of words and definitions


REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html



Monday April 25, 2011

Picture
Please bring your Julius Caesar
book with you to class today.









*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. READ-
Julius Caesar Act I Scene 1   Pages   -   
     (What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

     Sign up on whiteboard to read for the following Characters:

Act I Scene 1:        Narrator -          Flavius -           Carpenter-         Marullus -       Cobbler-    


II.  JC Notes - Literary Terms

           Pun (comic relief)- Act 1; Scene 1; Line 15 "a mender of bad souls"
         double entendre
(A word or expression that has two different meanings) -Act 2; Scene 1; line 69
         metaphor-
Act 1; Scene 2; Lines 68-69 "i, your glass"
         onomatopoeia-
Act 2; Scene 1; Line 44
         personification-
Act 1; Scene 1; Line 46


III. VOCABULARY - WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Fri. 04/29/11

                                        QUIZ over all 20 words - Friday 04/29/11


1.     tributaries (noun) – captives

2.     replication (noun) – echo; copy

3.     intermit (verb) – hold back

4.     vulgar (adj.) – common

5.     construe (verb) – interpret

6.     tempests (noun) – storms

7.     rived (verb) – split

8.     saucy (adj.) – disrespectful; presumptuous

9.     portentous (adj.) – ominous

10.   ordinance (noun) – natural behavior

11.     infirmity (noun) – a bodily ailment or weakness

12.     rogues (noun) – a vagrant, scoundrel, or rascal

13.     redress (verb) – to set right or make amends

14.     disjoin (verb) – to separate

15.     insurrection (noun) – the act or instance of open revolt against a government

16.     visage (noun) – appearance; aspect

17.     affable (adj.) – gracious and generous

18.     semblance (noun) – outward token or appearance

19.     palter (verb) – deceive by confusion

20. carrion (noun) – dead and decaying flesh


HOMEWORK

I. Literature Book Page 779 - Reading Check & Interpretations
     Answer Questions 1 - 13 - Due Wednesday April 27, 2011


REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo.weebly.com/book-rpts.html


Friday April 15, through Friday April 22, 2011

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        Spring Recess Holiday. No School!


Thursday April 14, 2011

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* Students you do not need to bring your Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

* No vocabulary this week






I. Watch Film: Julius Caesar

A back-story to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. The film takes an epic look at Julius Caesar, Rome's last dictator, whose death also signaled the end of the Roman Republic. Chronicles his campaigns in Gaul and Egypt, his rivalry with General Pompey, and his eventual assassination at the hands of Brutus and Cassius. The film will hopefully help students become more familiar with the characters and gain a deeper understanding of what motivates each of them.


II. Use Character Sheet to keep track of all the major players from the film/play.
      Record character traits and important events that occur.

REMINDERS

* Book Report #4Due Friday June 10, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Wednesday April 13, 2011

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* Students you do not need to bring your Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

* No vocabulary this week






I. Watch Film:Julius Caesar

A back-story to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. The film takes an epic look at Julius Caesar, Rome's last dictator, whose death also signaled the end of the Roman Republic. Chronicles his campaigns in Gaul and Egypt, his rivalry with General Pompey, and his eventual assassination at the hands of Brutus and Cassius. The film will hopefully help students become more familiar with the characters and gain a deeper understanding of what motivates each of them.


II. Use Character Sheet to keep track of all the major players from the film/play.
      Record character traits and important events that occur.


Tuesday April 12, 2011

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* Students you do not need to bring your Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

* No vocabulary this week






I. Watch Film:Julius Caesar

A back-story to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. The film takes an epic look at Julius Caesar, Rome's last dictator, whose death also signaled the end of the Roman Republic. Chronicles his campaigns in Gaul and Egypt, his rivalry with General Pompey, and his eventual assassination at the hands of Brutus and Cassius. The film will hopefully help students become more familiar with the characters and gain a deeper understanding of what motivates each of them.


II. Use Character Sheet to keep track of all the major players from the film/play.
      Record character traits and important events that occur.


Monday April 11, 2011

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* Students you do not need to bring your Julius Caesar book with you to class today.

* No vocabulary this week






I. Watch Film:Julius Caesar

A back-story to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. The film takes an epic look at Julius Caesar, Rome's last dictator, whose death also signaled the end of the Roman Republic. Chronicles his campaigns in Gaul and Egypt, his rivalry with General Pompey, and his eventual assassination at the hands of Brutus and Cassius. The film will hopefully help students become more familiar with the characters and gain a deeper understanding of what motivates each of them.

II. Use Character Sheet to keep track of all the major players from the film/play.
      Record character traits and important events that occur.





Friday April 8, 2011

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* California Education Content Standards Benchmark Test #3


Thursday April 7, 2011

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* Students Bring your "Literature Book with” you
   to class today, Monday 4/4 through Tuesday 4/5


Wednesday April 6, 2011

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* Students Bring your "Literature Book with” you
   to class today, Monday 4/4 through Tuesday 4/5


Tuesday April 5, 2011
                    Elizabethan Theatre

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* Students Bring your "Literature Book with” you
   to class today, Monday 4/4 through Tuesday 4/5

HAND IN Journal: Quickwrite, Literature Book
                             Page 755  &  Book Report #3






The theatre in Shakespeare’s time was much different than it is today. Authors wrote plays for the masses,
especially those who couldn’t read or write.

The theatre changed a lot during Shakespeare’s lifetime. The authorities didn’t like it and didn’t allow acting in the city itself. They thought it had a bad influence on people and kept them from going to church. Queen Elizabeth, on the other hand, loved acting and helped the theatre become popular.

As time went on more and more popular theatres emerged outside city walls. This was considered an unsafe area with crime and prostitution.

Shakespeare’s theatre was full of life. People did not sit all the time and it was not quiet during the performance. The audience could walk around, eat and drink during the play. They cheered, booed and sometimes even threw objects at the actors.

Theatres were open arenas or playhouses that had room for up to three thousand people. They were structures made mainly of wood. There was no heating and actors got wet when it rained. The stage was higher and there was an open pit in front of it where most of the people could stand in. Richer people and noblemen sat in the gallery. There was almost no scenery because the dialogue was the most important part of the play. Colourful and well-designed costumes were very important and told the people about the status of a character. Women never performed in plays, so young boys played female characters. The performances took place in the afternoon because it was too dark at night.


There was no stage crew as there is today. Actors had to do everything themselves -
from making costumes to setting the stage.

Plays were organized by acting companies. They performed about 6 different plays each week because they needed money to survive. They had almost no time for rehearsals.

The companies in Shakespeare’s time had a hierarchical system.

  • The company belonged to shareholders and mangers. They were responsible for everything and got most of the money when the company was successful. Sometimes they even owned there own buildings.
  • Actors worked for the managers and after some time became a permanent member of the company.
  • Apprentices were young boys were allowed to act in menial roles. They also played females characters in plays.

Lord Chamberlain’s Men and theAdmiral’s Menwere the two most important companies in London at that time. Among the most famous theatres during were the Globe, the Swan and the Fortune.


*CLASSWORK

I. WATCH A & E's Biography - William Shakespeare: A Life of Drama

*REMINDERS:

* Bring "NIGHT" book with you to class to return to library on  Wednesday 4/6



Monday April 4, 2011

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* Students Bring your "Literature Book with” you
   to class today, Monday 4/4 through Tuesday 4/5








*CLASSWORK

I. READ from Literature Book Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Stage: Intro to

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Pages 741 - 753

(Read together in class)


*HOMEWORK


I. Literature Book Page 755 -  Journal: See Quickwrite - Compose 1/2 pg Due Tuesday 4/5


*REMINDERS:


* Bring "NIGHT" book with you to class to return to library on  Wednesday 4/6

* Book Report #3- Due Tuesday April 5, 2011

(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details)

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book-reports.html




Friday April 1, 2011

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* No Vocabulary this week

Hand in  JOURNAL #9 - Hiroshima

Make sure to bring your "Literature Book" with  you
to class on Thursday, March 31st and Friday April 1st





CLASSWORK


WATCH The Masque of the Red Death FILM and
Scourge Of The Black Death - DVD

*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3- Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Thursday March 31, 2011
The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe

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* No Vocabulary this week

Hand in 
JOURNAL #9 Hiroshima

Make sure to bring your "Literature Book" with  you
to class on Thursday, March 31st and Friday April 1st






CLASSWORK


READ The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe

*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3- Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Wednesday March 30, 2011

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* No Vocabulary this week

Hand in  Hiroshima film questions

by the end of the period today.

Make sure to bring your "Literature Book" with  you
to class on Thursday, March 31st and Friday April 1st




CLASSWORK


I. Finish watching film: Hiroshima

II. JOURNAL #9 TITLE:  Hiroshima - WRITE  1 page total - Due Today Wed, March 30th


A. John Hersey, author of the book, Hiroshima wrote, “A surprising number of the people of Hiroshima remained more or less indifferent about the ethics of the bomb.” Why is this so? How do you feel about it as an ethical issue? Taking into consideration the emotions and feelings of the times, write an editorial either in support of or in opposition to the use of the atomic bomb. Give supporting detail from the film. Write 1/2 Pg.

B. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were forced to live in internment camps. Write 1/2 page  arguing for or against the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.


*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html





Tuesday March 29, 2011

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* No Vocabulary this week






CLASSWORK

Film:  Farewell to Manzanar- Hiroshima (Continued from Friday)

(A follow-up to the stories “Lord of the Flies,” “Night,” and “Farewell to Manzanar “ demonstrating what can happen when mankind has zero tolerance and uses destructive forces to solve disputes Hiroshima is a dramatized documentary exploring the humanity and the horror of the first atomic attack. )

1. The blast was equivalent to ________ million sticks of dynamite.

2. Late in the war, were the Japanese diplomats ready to surrender?  Were the Japanese military leaders ready to surrender?

3. What were Japanese soldiers being trained to do to American tanks if there was an invasion?

4. Was Stalin surprised by President Truman when told about the atomic bomb?

5. The United States did offer the Japanese government an opportunity to surrender  but it was rejected. Why?

6. Why had the United States not fire-bombed Hiroshima earlier in the war?

7. Why did Deke Parsons decide to arm the bomb after the plane was airborne even though that was going to be difficult?

8. How much did the Little Boy bomb weigh?

9. How many seconds elapsed between the bomb drop and the detonation?

10. The temperature below the detonation was __________ degrees Celsius.

11. The _____________________ blast followed the development of the mushroom cloud.

12. After the bombing, why was the rain black?

13. What else did the rain contain?

14. Did President Truman warn Japan against a second bomb attack?

15. How many people died in the Nagasaki bombing?

16. Which country declared war on Japan even before the Japanese government had heard about the bombing of Nagasaki?

17. Japan surrendered on _____________, 1945.

18. A mysterious illness appeared about 4 days after the bombing. The victims were found to have no ____________________ and couldn’t fight infections. They were ______________ from the inside.

19. Today, more than _________ million people live in Hiroshima.

20. What was Dr. Hida’s thought as to why the bombs were dropped?

21. What signs of the bombings can still be seen in the cities?

22. What happens in Hiroshima each August 6th

*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 


http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Monday March 28, 2011

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No School Today!


Friday March 25, 2011

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* No Vocabulary this week







CLASSWORK

I. Present your Fractured Fairytale to your classmates for extra credit points

II. Film:  Farewell to Manzanar - Hiroshima

(A follow-up to the stories “Lord of the Flies,” “Night,” and “Farewell to Manzanar “ demonstrating what can happen when mankind has zero tolerance and uses destructive forces to solve disputes. Hiroshima is a dramatized documentary exploring the humanity and the horror of the first atomic attack. )

1. The blast was equivalent to ________ million sticks of dynamite.

2. Late in the war, were the Japanese diplomats ready to surrender?  Were the Japanese military leaders ready to surrender?

3. What were Japanese soldiers being trained to do to American tanks if there was an invasion?

4. Was Stalin surprised by President Truman when told about the atomic bomb?

5. The United States did offer the Japanese government an opportunity to surrender  but it was rejected. Why?

6. Why had the United States not fire-bombed Hiroshima earlier in the war?

7. Why did Deke Parsons decide to arm the bomb after the plane was airborne even though that was going to be difficult?

8. How much did the Little Boy bomb weigh?

9. How many seconds elapsed between the bomb drop and the detonation?

10. The temperature below the detonation was __________ degrees Celsius.

11. The _____________________ blast followed the development of the mushroom cloud.

12. After the bombing, why was the rain black?

13. What else did the rain contain?

14. Did President Truman warn Japan against a second bomb attack?

15. How many people died in the Nagasaki bombing?

16. Which country declared war on Japan even before the Japanese government had heard about the bombing of Nagasaki?

17. Japan surrendered on _____________, 1945.

18. A mysterious illness appeared about 4 days after the bombing. The victims were found to have no ____________________ and couldn’t fight infections. They were ______________ from the inside.

19. Today, more than _________ million people live in Hiroshima.

20. What was Dr. Hida’s thought as to why the bombs were dropped?

21. What signs of the bombings can still be seen in the cities?

22. What happens in Hiroshima each August 6th

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Thursday March 24, 2011

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* 10th Grade Fall Registration 2011 -
    Brewer Theater (Per. 1 Registration)


Wednesday March 23, 2011

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Bring your "Literature Book" with  you
to class Mon, March 21st - Fri, March 25th


* No Vocabulary this week


*   HAND IN- Homework from Literature Book
     The Story-Teller Pages 161 #1-9 - DUE TODAY



CLASSWORK


I. Working with a partner, review Pages 154 - 159 in your literature book and compose
     a one page SATIRE similar to  Saki's THE STORY-TELLER. Reimagine your favorite  
     Fairy Tale and retell the story in the most demented way possible. Present story to
      your classmates for extra credit points

Example:

See the The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka.
(The story of the three little pigs told from Alexander T. Wolf's point of view)

http://www.shol.com/agita/wolfside.htm

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Tuesday, March 22, 2011

THE STORY-TELLER
Short Stories of Saki (H. H. Munro)

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Bring your "Literature Book" with  you
to class Mon, March 21st - Fri, March 25th


* No Vocabulary this week


* HAND IN - Homework
from Literature Book
                           By the Waters of Babylon Page 152 #1-11




* 10th Grade Fall Registration 2011 - Brewer Theater (Periods 2 & 3 only)
   Per. 1 Registration will be Thurs. 3/24

CLASSWORK

I. Discuss "By the Waters of Babylon"

II. Take Notes on Literay Terms

III. READ "The Storyteller" by Saki - Literature Book - Pages 154 - 160

HOMEWORK

I. Answer Questions from Literature Book Page 161 #1-9 - DUE WEDNESDAY  March 23rd

*REMINDERS:

Cerritos High School Open House Showcase 2011

Tuesday, March 22, 2010

Campus Opens at 5:30 for Pre-Showcase Events

Main Events 6:00 – 8:30pm 


* You will need your Literature Book with you in class on Monday, March 21st through Friday March 25th

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Monday, March 21, 2011

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* Bring your "Literature Book" with  you to class Mon, March 21st - Fri, March 25th

* No Vocabulary this week

* HAND IN - Homework  "Where Have You
Gone
   Charming Billy?"- Questions Page 630 # 2-8- Due Today

Literary Terms

First Person Point of View - When you tell a story through a viewpoint character using I or we, you are using first person point of view. Example: The banging on my door reverberated within my skull like a giant church bell in an empty hall. I groaned and rolled onto my stomach, pulling the pillow over my head.


Unreliable Narrator - An unreliable narrator works under the constraints of limited knowledge to convey information that may seem justifiably suspect to the reader. This type of narration typically displays characteristics or tendencies that indicate a lack of credibility or understanding of the story.

Third-personlimited narration or  limited omniscienc : Focussing a third-person narration through the eyes of a single character. Even when an author chooses to tell a narrative through omnisient narration, he will sometimes (or even for the entire tale) limit the perspective of the narrative to that of a single character, choosing for example only to narrate the inner thoughts of that one character. The narrative is still told in 3rd person (unlike 1st person narration); however, it is clear that it is, nonetheless, being told through the eyes of a single character.


Allusion - When a writer or speaker refers to something from history or literature and expects her audience to understand to what she is referring, she is alluding or making an allusion. I felt like Custer at Little Big Horn when all of the freshmen were attacking me with questions about their lockers and combinations. (The speaker is alluding to the massacre of General George Armstrong Custer Little Big Horn.) How long has it been raining? It seems as if it has been forty days and forty nights. (The speaker likens the weather to Noah's flood which lasted forty days and forty nights.) Do not confuse allusion with the word illusion.

CLASSWORK

Narrative and Voice

I. READ "By the Waters of Babylon" - Literature Book Pages 140 - 151
(What we don't finish reading in class together, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

HOMEWORK

I. Answer Questions from Literature Book Page 152 #1-11 - DUE TUESDAY  March 22nd

*REMINDERS:

* You will need your Literature Book with you in class on Monday, March 21stthrough Friday March 25th

* Book Report #3- Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html





Friday, March 18, 2011

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Hand In -Vocabulary #11 Sentences





CLASSWORK

I. Vocabulary #11 Quiz - Matching (Handout)

II. Holt Handbook- Pages 331 - 332, Exercise 4 (1-10) and Exercise 5 (1-10) - DUE TODAY

III. Literature Book - READ "Where Have You Gone Charming Billy?" Pages 620 - 628

HOMEWORK

I. Answer Questions Page 630 #s  2-8 - DUE MONDAY  March 21st

*REMINDERS:

* You will need your Literature Book with you in class on Monday, March 21st

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Thursday, March 17, 2011

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You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.




CLASSWORK


Night Test Sections 1-9 - Scantron, Multiple Choice, 75 Questions, 150 Points

HOMEWORK


I. Study for VOCABULARY#11  - "NIGHT" Words Part 2

II. WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 3/18/11

*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Wednesday, March 16, 2011

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You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.





CLASSWORK

I. Watch scenes from the film "Schindler's List"

Perhaps the most moving image in Steven Spielberg's epic Schindler's List is the little girl in the red coat. The girl in the red coat is the most obvious symbol in the film, simply because her coat is the only color object, presented in the main body of the black & white film. To Schindler, she represents the innocence of the Jews being slaughtered. Her oblivion mirrors the inaction of the Allied powers in helping to save the Jews. This one child is a symbol of all the 6,000,000 victims, exposed to ruthless slaughter. Each was an individual, who had dreams, who had a life, who had a family. Schindler watches the girl from his horse, high atop a hill  and is riveted by her, almost to the exclusion of the surrounding violence. The moment Schindler catches sight of her marks the moment when he is forced to confront the horror of Jewish life during the Holocaust and his own hand in that horror. Schindler later spots the little girl in a pile of exhumed dead bodies, and her death symbolizes the loss of innocence.


HOMEWORK


I. Study for Night Test Sections 1-9 - Thursday March 17, 2011

II. VOCABULARY#11  - "NIGHT" Words Part 2


WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 3/18/11

TEST over all 20 words - Friday 3/18/11

   1. emerged -
to come forth into view or notice, as from concealment
   2. hillock - a small hill or mound
   3. timid - lacking in self-assurance, courage, or bravery; easily alarmed
   4. tiers - a layer; level
   5. beseeching - sought or -seeched, to implore urgently
   6. livid - enraged; furiously angry
   7. dysentery - intestinal inflammation causing abnormal pain and diarrhea
   8. invalids - a person who is too sick or weak to care for himself
   9. wailing - to utter a prolonged, inarticulate, mournful cry
  10. spasmodically - bursts of excitement
  11. summons - a request, demand, or call to do something
  12. conscience - the inner sense of what is right or wrong in one's conduct or motives
  13. delirious - hallucinating, excited, frantic
  14. pleaded - to appeal or entreat earnestly
  15. indifference - lack of interest or concern
  16. distinguish - to recognize as distinct  or different
  17. spectacle - a public show or display
  18. vitality - exuberant physical strength or mental vigor
  19. disengage - to release from attachment or connection; loosen; unfasten
  20. grimace - a facial expression, often ugly or contorted, that indicates disapproval, pain

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 


http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Tuesday, March 15, 2011

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You will need your "Night" book with you in class today.


HAND IN Night Section 8 & 9 Questions - Due Today







CLASSWORK

I. REVIEWNight Sections 1- 9 for Thursday's (3/17) Test

Know the  following literary terms and identify examples
of each of these terms in the context of the novel.

  • Autobiography: the story of a person's life written by that person

  • Point of view: perspective the author provides for the
                                 reader to observe the events of a story

  • Conflict: opposing forces in a literary work that can be either internal or external

  • Irony: the opposite of what is expected occurs

  • Imagery the use of vivid, descriptive language to create
                      meaningful “word pictures” in a literary work

  • Symbolism: the use of one thing to suggest or represent something else (Fire, Night)

  • Theme: a main idea or central person of a story that is either stated or unstated

  • Foreshadowing: device a writer uses to hint at a future course of action

  • Simile: Comparing one thing to an unlike thing by using like, as, or than.

  • Metaphor: Comparing one thing to an unlike thing without using like, as or than.

  • Motif : Recurring theme in a literary work (loss of faith; power of hope)
  • Mood: emotional effect that the text creates for the audience (positive or negative)

  • Tone: Prevailing atmosphere in a literary work; speaker’s attitude


    Complete in class on your own sheet of paper. Get your paper stamped when you finish
    the assignment. Keep to study from and turn in for credit on Thursday 3/17 before exam.

  Know the following for "Night" Test - (Answer questions in complete sentences)


1. Madame Schachter’s visions about fire on the train are an example of which literary  
      element? Explain how this works.

2. Eliezer and his father leaving the camp hospital before it is safely liberated illustrate an
       example of which literary element? Explain.

3. What is the climax/turning pointof Elie Wiesel’s memoir, Night?

4. What are some examples of internal, man versus himself conflict in Elie Wiesel’s Night ?

5. How did the Jews of Sighet feel about the poor?

6. How did the Jews of Sighet feel when the foreign-born Jews are expelled?


7. How did the Jews of Sighet first feel about living in the ghettos?

8. When does Elie first see Nazi brutality?

9. How does Elie’s view about God change throughout the novel?

10. How do fellow prisoners treat each other? Why?

11. When does Elie’s father die?


12. Explain the difference between Elie Wiesel the author and Eliezer the narrator.

13. What is Wiesel's purpose in writing Night?

14. What role does faith play in the novel?

15. What significance do the novel's last lines have on its meaning?

16. In chapter one, the town of Sighet remains in denial, despite an abundance of evidence indicating that they are in danger. Why does no one believe what is about to happen?

17. Why does Wiesel use figurative language to such a large extent?


HOMEWORK

I. VOCABULARY#11  - "NIGHT" Words Part 2
WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 3/18/11
TEST over all 20 words - Friday 3/18/11

   1. emerged - to come forth into view or notice, as from concealment
   2. hillock - a small hill or mound
   3. timid - lacking in self-assurance, courage, or bravery; easily alarmed
   4. tiers - a layer; level
   5. beseeching - sought or -seeched, to implore urgently
   6. livid - enraged; furiously angry
   7. dysentery - intestinal inflammation causing abnormal pain and diarrhea
   8. invalids - a person who is too sick or weak to care for himself
   9. wailing - to utter a prolonged, inarticulate, mournful cry
  10. spasmodically - bursts of excitement
  11. summons - a request, demand, or call to do something
  12. conscience - the inner sense of what is right or wrong in one's conduct or motives
  13. delirious - hallucinating, excited, frantic
  14. pleaded - to appeal or entreat earnestly
  15. indifference - lack of interest or concern
  16. distinguish - to recognize as distinct  or different
  17. spectacle - a public show or display
  18. vitality - exuberant physical strength or mental vigor
  19. disengage - to release from attachment or connection; loosen; unfasten
  20. grimace - a facial expression, often ugly or contorted, that indicates disapproval, pain

*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html

* Night Test Sections 1-9 - Thursday March 17, 2011


NIGHT TEST STUDY GUIDE

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KEY LITERARY ELEMENTS




SETTINGS

Night is set during the Second World War. The first section of the novel begins in Sighet, a small town in Transylvania (Romania) and ends in a train which stops in Kaschau (Czechoslovakia).

The second section of the book continues in the train as the deportees head towards Auschwitz, the Death Camp.

In the third section, the setting shifts to Birkenau, which is the selection and disposal center for the prisoners. Elie and his father survive the selection process and enter Auschwitz, where they are both repeatedly tortured.

In the fourth section, they are marched to Buna, where the author stays for the longest period in the span of the book.

Section five is also set in Buna.

In section six, the prisoners are marched through snow to Gleiwitz, for the Germans do not want them to be liberated by the approaching Russian Army.

In the seventh section, the surviving prisoners are loaded in roofless cattle wagons and sent on a freezing ten-day journey to Buchenwald in Germany.

In the eighth section, Elie is seen nursing his sick father, who eventually dies at Buchenwald.

In the ninth and final section of the book, the Allied army arrives and frees the prisoners. After his release, Elie grows very ill and must be hospitalized. The book ends with his looking at himself in the mirror and thinking that he looks like a corpse.

LIST OF CHARACTERS

Major Characters

Eliezer Wiesel (Elie)

The narrator, protagonist, and main character. Since he is a Jewish teenager living in Romania during Hitler's occupation and reign, he is persecuted and imprisoned. The book is really a telling of his experiences during the war.

Shlomo Wiesel (also translated as Chlomo)

Elie's father. He is a considerate and religious man and shopkeeper who is respected by the villagers. He is arrested along with his son and imprisoned in a concentration camp, where he dies.

Minor Characters

Moshe the Beadle

A poor and lonely religious man. He tells terrifying tales about the condition of the Jews in concentration camps, which Elie and the villagers find hard to believe.

Mrs. Wiesel

Elie's mother. She is a loving person who cares for her family and who works to infuse courage in others.

Hilda Wiesel

Elie's oldest sister, who works in the family grocery store. She is arrested and deported to a concentration camp. Like her brother, she manages to survive the experience.

Beatrice Wiesel (Bea)

Elie's older sister, who is the second child in the family. She also manages to survive.

Tzipora

Elie's younger sister, who does not survive the concentration camp. She gives an impression of both innocence and stoicism.

Batya Reich

A relative who stays with the Wiesels in the Sighet ghetto.

Stein of Antwerp

A relative who meets Elie and his father at Auschwitz. He is worried about his wife and his sons. Elie cheers him by telling him the lie that his mother has been receiving letters from Steins' wife.

Berkovitz

A villager who reports on the terror inflicted on Hungarian Jews.

Madame Kahn

Wiesel's neighbor. She provides temporary accommodation to a German officer.

The Hungarian Police Officer

A kind officer who assures Elie's father that he will inform him if there is danger. He keeps his promise.

Stern

A police officer in Sighet. He calls Chlomo Wiesel to attend a council meeting.

Maria

The considerate maidservant of the Wiesels, who offers them shelter and safety. Unfortunately Mr. Wiesel does not accept her offer.

Madame Schachter

A fifty year old deportee who has hallucinations of "fire and furnace" while traveling on the train.

Madame Schachter's son

A ten-year old boy who seems quite courageous for his age.

Bela Katz

The son of a tradesman in Sighet. He is made to work in the crematory.

Yechiel

The brother of a Rabbi from Sighet. He weeps for Elie and his father when they arrive at Birkenau.

Akiba Drumer

A singer with a deep voice; he dies in the concentration camp.

Juliek

A Polish musician who plays the violin in Buna. He gives his final performance when the prisoners arrive at Gleiwitz and dies the next day.

Louis

A Dutch violinist who regrets that Jews are not allowed to play Beethoven's music.

Hans

A Berlin musician who tries to relax Elie, who is suffering from tension due to his assignment in the electrical warehouse.

Franek

A former student from Warsaw. He demands the gold from Elie's tooth and tries to bully him. Since Elie does not give him the gold tooth, he tortures his father.

Yossi and Tibi

Czech brothers whose parents are killed. They work in the electrical warehouse with Elie and become his friends.

Alphonse

A kind German Jew who gives extra soup to the young and the weak.

The French Jewess

A woman who pretends to be an Aryan to keep herself safe. She works in the electrical warehouse and befriends Elie.

The Young Thief from Warsaw

A strong young man who blesses liberty and curses the Germans before he is hung.

Dutch Ogerkapo

A kind supervisor who is tortured for blowing up Buna's power station. In spite of the torture, he does not name his co-conspirators.

Pipel

A thirteen-year-old boy who looks angelic. He is an assistant to the Dutch Ogerkapo. When he is hanged, it takes him more than thirty minutes to die because he weighs so little.

Elie's Blockaelteste

An experienced man who guides the prisoners on how to pass through the selection process.

The Polish Rabbi

A Rabbi from a small town in Poland; he is a sincere student of the Talmud.

The hospitalized Hungarian Jew

A patient with severe dysentery. He lies in a bed near Elie. He is sure that he will not pass the selection test and believes that all Jews will be killed before the end of the war.

The Jewish doctor

A kind doctor who operates on Elie's infected foot.


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Zalman

A worker in the electrical warehouse who dies during the journey from Buna.

Rabbi Eliahou

An aged Rabbi. He desperately searches for his son, whom he cannot find during the journey from Buna.

Eliahou's Son

A selfish and traitorous young man who leaves his father behind to save himself.

Meir Katz

A strong gardener from Sighet. He helps to free Elie from an attacker in the train to Gleiwitz.

Idek

A violent Kapo in the Buna warehouse. He lashes Elie cruelly during one of his violent fits, because Elie has seen him lying on the mattress with a woman.

The Dentist from Czechoslovakia

A corrupt man who enriches himself by collecting gold teeth. He tries unsuccessfully to persuade Elie to give him his gold tooth.

The Dentist from Warsaw

A polish dentist who pulls out Elie's gold tooth, using a rusty spoon, instead of an extractor.

CONFLICT

Since Night is the autobiographical account of Elie Wiesel during World War II, it does not follow the traditional pattern of fictional plot development. The book can, however, be viewed as having a protagonist and antagonist.

Protagonist

The narrator, main character, and protagonist of the book is Eliezer Wiesel (Elie). In the beginning, he is a young Jewish teenager living in Romania during Hitler's reign. A religious and studious young man, he possesses a strong sense of tradition and faith. Once he and his father are arrested by the Nazis and deported, his life becomes a struggle to survive. He is horribly tortured to the point that he loses faith in God.

Antagonists

The antagonists in the book are Hitler and his anti- Semitic Nazi regime, who persecute and kill Jews. Included amongst the antagonists are the Hungarian Policemen, the Gestapo, and the Nazi guards and doctors. Through much of the book, these characters torture Elie, until he is emotionally and physically shattered.

Climax


The climax occurs approximately halfway through the book, in the fifth section, when Elie loses his faith in God, which has been so important to him throughout life. He is so horrified over the torture that he has witnessed and endured, he questions if God exists and refuses to pray to Him on Rosh Hashanah. It is obvious that the antagonist has gotten the best of Elie Wiesel.

Outcome

The book ends as a tragedy. Besides being horribly tortured himself, Elie also endures horrendous emotional torture. He loses his faith in God; he also loses his father, mother, and younger sister. Even though he survives the concentration camp and is rescued by Allied forces, Elie is very sick, both physically and emotionally. His sufferings have turned his soul into a living corpse, shadowed forever by the long, black night of evil he has endured.


SHORT PLOT SUMMARY (Synopsis)

The story begins in 1941, when Elie was twelve years old and living in Sighet with his family. In spite of his youth, the Jewish Elie was eager to study the Talmud and Cabbala. His father, however, thinks Elie is too young for such advanced subjects and refuses to find him a teacher. As a result, Elie turns to Moshe the Beadle for guidance.

One day Moshe is arrested by the Nazis. When he returns, he tells the villagers about how he has miraculously escaped from his torturers. He also tells them shocking stories about the atrocities committed against the Jews by Hitler's regime. When Elie and the other villagers do not believe his stories, thinking he has gone mad, Moshe weeps and tells his story again.

As time passes, the Nazis treat the Jews worse and worse. First they shift the Jewish people to live in ghettos; then they arrest them and transport them to Birkenau, the reception center that leads to Auschwitz. Elie, his parents, and his sisters are arrested by the Nazis and sent by cattle car to Birkenau. During the journey, Elie, his family, and the other Jews suffer from the inhuman conditions they must endure; they are also driven to distraction by the hysterical screams of Madame Schachter, who has hallucinations of fire and furnace.

When Elie and his family arrive at the concentration camp, they see flames rising out of an oven, which is actually a crematorium for the prisoners. They are repulsed by the stench of burning flesh. Then Elie and his father are separated from his mother and sisters. In the men's camp, Elie fights to protect his father and is repeatedly tortured himself. Gradually he begins to lose faith in God because of the atrocities he must witness and endure. On the eve of Rosh Hashanah, a Jewish Holy Day, Elie refuses to pray.

In the camp, a regular process of selection takes place to separate the physically fit prisoners from the unfit or sick ones. The abler men are given a chance to work and live, while the weaker ones are sent to the furnaces to be killed. Both Elie and his father survive the selection process; but they know there is no guarantee that they will survive the work and brutality. They often watch other prisoners as they are hanged for some little offense. The Nazis even hang an innocent thirteen-year-old boy with an angelic face.

In January 1945, Russian liberation forces draw near Buna, the camp where Elie and his father are staying. As a result, the Nazis evacuate the camp and force the prisoners to run through the snow toward Gleiwitz; they do not provide them any food or water during the trip. Elie and his father are amongst the prisoners forced to make the journey; it is a particularly difficult trip for Elie, for he has recently had an operation on his right foot, due to an infection. Elie struggles to keep up the pace, for the prisoners who fall behind are shot by the Nazis; many others fall down and are trampled to death by other prisoners.

Finally, the prisoners are loaded into roofless cattle-cars and taken to Buchenwald in central Germany. Many people die during the journey because of exposure and starvation, but Elie and his father manage to survive. At Buchenwald, however, Elie's father grows very ill, suffering from dysentery and malnutrition. He is also cruelly beaten on his skull. Elie tries his best to nurse his sick father back to health, getting very little sleep himself.

One night Elie unwillingly falls asleep due to his total exhaustion. When he wakes up, he finds that his father is not in his bed. He suspects that he has been taken to the crematorium, while he was still breathing, for the Nazis would judge the sick, old man as worthless. Elie is left with a life long repentance that he did not look after his sick father until the last moment.

At the end of the book, the Allied forces arrive at the concentration camp and liberate the prisoners. Even though he is freed, Elie is physically and emotionally devastated from his year of imprisonment. Three days after his release, he becomes seriously ill and must be hospitalized. When he has recovered enough to get out of bed, Elie looks in the mirror and thinks that he looks like a corpse. He knows he will always be haunted by the horror he has endured; the memory will forever be like a dark and scary night to him.

THEMES

Major Theme

The major theme of the book is the horror that results from extreme prejudice. Because Hitler hated Jewish people, he caused them to be imprisoned, tortured, and murdered. The book records the horrendous experiences of Elie Wiesel, the Jewish author, during Hitler's reign of terror. He is arrested, imprisoned in a concentration camp, and tortured. Although he escapes death, he is totally devastated by the things he must endure and witness during the holocaust. The book is a recording of man's inhumanity to man at its worst.

Eliezer’s Struggle to Maintain
Faith in a Benevolent God


Eliezer’s struggle with his faith is a dominant conflict in Night. At the beginning of the work, his faith in God is absolute. When asked why he prays to God, he answers, “Why did I pray? . . . Why did I live? Why did I breathe?” His belief in an omnipotent, benevolent God is unconditional, and he cannot imagine living without faith in a divine power. But this faith is shaken by his experience during the Holocaust.

Initially, Eliezer’s faith is a product of his studies in Jewish mysticism, which teach him that God is everywhere in the world, that nothing exists without God, that in fact everything in the physical world is an “emanation,” or reflection, of the divine world. In other words, Eliezer has grown up believing that everything on Earth reflects God’s holiness and power. His faith is grounded in the idea that God is everywhere, all the time, that his divinity touches every aspect of his daily life. Since God is good, his studies teach him, and God is everywhere in the world, the world must therefore be good.

Eliezer’s faith in the goodness of the world is irreparably shaken, however, by the cruelty and evil he witnesses during the Holocaust. He cannot imagine that the concentration camps’ unbelievable, disgusting cruelty could possibly reflect divinity. He wonders how a benevolent God could be part of such depravity and how an omnipotent God could permit such cruelty to take place. His faith is equally shaken by the cruelty and selfishness he sees among the prisoners. If all the prisoners were to unite to oppose the cruel oppression of the Nazis, Eliezer believes, then maybe he could understand the Nazi menace as an evil aberration. He would then be able to maintain the belief that humankind is essentially good. But he sees that the Holocaust exposes the selfishness, evil, and cruelty of which everybody--not only the Nazis, but also his fellow prisoners, his fellow Jews, even himself—is capable. If the world is so disgusting and cruel, he feels, then God either must be disgusting and cruel or must not exist at all.

Though this realization seems to annihilate his faith, Eliezer manages to retain some of this faith throughout his experiences. At certain moments—during his first night in the camp and during the hanging of the pipel--Eliezer does grapple with his faith, but his struggle should not be confused with a complete abandonment of his faith. This struggle doesn’t diminish his belief in God; rather, it is essential to the existence of that belief. When Moshe the Beadle is asked why he prays, he replies, “I pray to the God within me that He will give me the strength to ask Him the right questions.” In other words, questioning is fundamental to the idea of faith in God. The Holocaust forces Eliezer to ask horrible questions about the nature of good and evil and about whether God exists. But the very fact that he asks these questions reflects his commitment to God.

Discussing his own experience, Wiesel once wrote, “My anger rises up within faith and not outside it.” Eliezer’s struggle reflects such a sentiment. Only in the lowest moments of his faith does he turn his back on God. Indeed, even when Eliezer says that he has given up on God completely, Wiesel’s constant use of religious metaphors undercuts what Eliezer says he believes. Eliezer even refers to biblical passages when he denies his faith. When he fears that he might abandon his father, he prays to God, and, after his father’s death, he expresses regret that there was no religious memorial. At the end of the book, even though he has been forever changed by his Holocaust experience, Eliezer emerges with his faith intact.

Silence

In one of Night’s most famous passages, Eliezer states, “Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence which deprived me, for all eternity, of the desire to live.” It is the idea of God’s silence that he finds most troubling, as this description of an event at Buna reveals: as the Gestapo hangs a young boy, a man asks, “Where is God?” yet the only response is “[t]otal silence throughout the camp.” Eliezer and his companions are left to wonder how an all-knowing, all-powerful God can allow such horror and cruelty to occur, especially to such devout worshipers. The existence of this horror, and the lack of a divine response, forever shakes Eliezer’s faith in God.

It is worth noting that God’s silence during the hanging of the young boy recalls the story of the Akedah—the Binding of Isaac—found in the Hebrew Scriptures (Genesis 22). In the Akedah, God decides to test the faith of Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his only son, Isaac. Abraham does not doubt his God, and he ties Isaac to a sacrificial altar. He raises a knife to kill the boy, but at the last minute God sends an angel to save Isaac. The angel explains that God merely wanted to test Abraham’s faith and, of course, would never permit him to shed innocent blood. Unlike the God in Night, the God in the Akedah is not silent.

Night can be read as a reversal of the Akedah story: at the moment of a horrible sacrifice, God does not intervene to save innocent lives. There is no angel swooping down as masses burn in the crematorium, or as Eliezer’s father lies beaten and bloodied. Eliezer and the other prisoners call out for God, and their only response is silence; during his first night at Birkenau, Eliezer says, “The Eternal . . . was silent. What had I to thank Him for?” The lesson Eliezer learns is the opposite of the lesson taught in the Bible. The moral of the Akedah is that God demands sacrifice but is ultimately compassionate. During the Holocaust, however, Eliezer feels that God’s silence demonstrates the absence of divine compassion; as a result, he ultimately questions the very existence of God.

There is also a second type of silence operating throughout Night: the silence of the victims, and the lack of resistance to the Nazi threat. When his father is beaten at the end of his life, Eliezer remembers, “I did not move. I was afraid,” and he feels guilty about his inaction. It is implied throughout the text that silence and passivity are what allowed the Holocaust to continue. Wiesel’s writing of Night is itself an attempt to break the silence, to tell loudly and boldly of the atrocities of the Holocaust and, in this way, to try to prevent anything so horrible from ever happening again.

Inhumanity Toward Other Humans

Eliezer’s spiritual struggle owes to his shaken faith not only in God but in everything around him. After experiencing such cruelty, Eliezer can no longer make sense of his world. His disillusionment results from his painful experience with Nazi persecution, but also from the cruelty he sees fellow prisoners inflict on each other. Eliezer also becomes aware of the cruelty of which he himself is capable. Everything he experiences in the war shows him how horribly people can treat one another—a revelation that troubles him deeply.


The first insensible cruelty Eliezer experiences is that of the Nazis. Yet, when the Nazis first appear, they do not seem monstrous in any way. Eliezer recounts, “[O]ur first impressions of the Germans were most reassuring. . . . Their attitude toward their hosts was distant, but polite.” So many aspects of the Holocaust are incomprehensible, but perhaps the most difficult to understand is how human beings could so callously slaughter millions of innocent victims. Wiesel highlights this incomprehensible tragedy by pulling the Nazis into focus first as human beings, and then, as the memoir shifts to the concentration camps, showing the brutal atrocities that they committed.

Furthermore, Night demonstrates that cruelty breeds cruelty. Instead of comforting each other in times of difficulty, the prisoners respond to their circumstances by turning against one another. Near the end of the work, a Kapo says to Eliezer, “Here, every man has to fight for himself and not think of anyone else. . . . Here, there are no fathers, no brothers, no friends. Everyone lives and dies for himself alone.” It is significant that a Kapo makes this remark to the narrator, because Kapos were themselves prisoners placed in charge of other prisoners. They enjoyed a relatively better (though still horrendous) quality of life in the camp, but they aided the Nazi mission and often behaved cruelly toward prisoners in their charge. At the beginning of the fifth section, Eliezer refers to them as “functionaries of death.” The Kapos’ position symbolizes the way the Holocaust’s cruelty bred cruelty in its victims, turning people against each other, as self-preservation became the highest virtue.

The Importance of Father-Son Bonds

Eliezer is disgusted with the horrific selfishness he sees around him, especially when it involves the rupture of familial bonds. On three occasions, he mentions sons horribly mistreating fathers: in his brief discussion of the pipel who abused his father; his terrible conclusion about the motives of Rabbi Eliahou’s son; and his narration of the fight for food that he witnesses on the train to Buchenwald, in which a son beats his father to death. All of these moments of cruelty are provoked by the conditions the prisoners are forced to endure. In order to save themselves, these sons sacrifice their fathers.


Traces of the Akedah story (see Silence, above) run through the memoir, particularly in the guilt and sadness that Eliezer feels after his father’s death. Despite the love and care he has shown his father, Eliezer feels that he has somehow sacrificed his father for his own safety. This sacrifice is the inverse of the Akedah, in which a father (Abraham) is willing to sacrifice his son (Isaac). Night’s reversal of this example signifies the way the Holocaust has turned Eliezer’s entire world upside down.


Eliezer’s descriptions of his behavior toward his father seem to invalidate his guilty feelings. He depends on his father for support, and his love for his father allows him to endure. During the long run to Gleiwitz, he says, “My father’s presence was the only thing that stopped me [from allowing myself to die]. . . . I had no right to let myself die. What would he do without me? I was his only support.” Their relationship demonstrates that Eliezer’s love and solidarity are stronger forces of survival than his instinct for self-preservation.

NIGHT TEST STUDY GUIDE CONT.


Minor Theme

The importance of religious faith is a minor theme of the book. From an early age, Elie Wiesel has a tremendous love for religion, wanting to study the Cabbala and Talmud. When he is first imprisoned, it is his faith that helps him survive. Like most of the Jews, he prays regularly for an end to the persecution and strength to survive. His faith, however, is shaken when he sees the depth of the atrocities committed against his fellow Jews. On the eve of Rosh Hashanah, he finds that he cannot even pray, questioning if God exists amongst such cruelty to mankind. In the end, his faith returns and helps him deal with his experiences.


Motifs

Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, or literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes.

Tradition

Judaism is more than simply a religion; it is an entire culture that has, for most of its almost 6,000-year existence, been a dispersed culture, a nation without a country, a people without a home. As a result, memory and tradition play a significant role in Jewish life. In the absence of any geographic continuity, Judaism relies on customs, observances, and traditions, passed down from generation to generation, as the markers and bearers of cultural identity. Hitler and the Nazis wanted not only to destroy the Jewish people but also to humiliate them and eradicate all vestiges of Judaism. As Eliezer relates in Night, the Germans desecrated Jewish temples, forced Jews to break dietary laws, and deliberately shaved their heads and tattooed them in violation of Jewish Scripture. The Nazi genocide was an attempt to wipe out an entire people, including all sense of national and cultural unity.

Conversation and storytelling have always been important elements of Jewish folk tradition, and Chlomo’s storytelling symbolizes Jewish culture as a whole. His story is interrupted by the arrival of the Nazis, just as the Holocaust attempted to interrupt Jewish history as a whole. Throughout the book, Eliezer clings to tradition, even after his faith has apparently been lost, because it serves as an important link to life outside the Holocaust, beyond the terror and oppression he is experiencing. He struggles with the question of fasting on Yom Kippur. He expresses regret when he forgets to say Kaddish (a mourner’s prayer) for his deceased friend Akiba Drumer, not because he feels that he has forsaken an obligation to God, but because he feels that he has forsaken his commitment to his fellow Jews and fellow prisoners.

Religious Observance

During the first sections of Night, there are frequent mentions of religion and religious observance. Eliezer begins his story mentioning the Talmud and his Jewish studies and prayer rituals. He is upset that the Nazis desecrate the Sabbath and his synagogue. By the end of Night, however, mentions of Jewish observance have almost vanished from the text. Most striking, Eliezer does not mention the Kaddish by name after his father’s death, and says only that “[t]here were no prayers at his grave. No candles were lit in his memory.” By specifically avoiding Jewish terminology, Eliezer implies that religious observance has ceased to be a part of his life. Eliezer’s feelings about this loss are ambiguous: he has claimed that he has lost all faith in God, yet there is clearly regret and sadness in his tone when he discusses the lack of a religious memorial for his father.

Although Eliezer’s explicit mentions of religion vanish, religious metaphor holds Night’s entire narrative structure together. As noted above, the Akedah is a foundational metaphor for the work. Throughout the memoir, furthermore, Wiesel indirectly refers to biblical passages (Psalm 150, for example, when Eliezer discusses his loss of faith) and Jewish tradition (the Nazis’ selections on Yom Kippur of which prisoners will die—a cruel version of the Jewish belief that God selects who will live and who will die during the Days of Awe). Though Eliezer claims that religion and faith are no longer part of his life, both nevertheless form a tacit foundation for his entire story.

Symbols


Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts.

Fire

Fire appears throughout Night as a symbol of the Nazis’ cruel power. On the way to Auschwitz-Birkenau, Madame Schächter receives a vision of fire that serves as a premonition of the horror to come. Eliezer also sees the Nazis burning babies in a ditch. Most important, fire is the agent of destruction in the crematoria, where many meet their death at the hands of the Nazis.

The role of fire as a Nazi weapon reverses the role fire plays in the Bible and Jewish tradition. In the Bible, fire is associated with God and divine wrath. God appears to Moses as a burning bush, and vengeful angels wield flaming swords. In postbiblical literature, flame also is a force of divine retribution. In Gehenna—the Jewish version of Hell—the wicked are punished by fire. But in Night, it is the wicked who wield the power of fire, using it to punish the innocent. Such a reversal demonstrates how the experience of the Holocaust has upset Eliezer’s entire concept of the universe, especially his belief in a benevolent, or even just, God.

Night

The Bible begins with God’s creation of the earth. When God first begins his creation, the earth is “without form, and void; and darkness [is] upon the face of the deep” (Genesis 1:2, King James Version). God’s first act is to create light and dispel this darkness. Darkness and night therefore symbolize a world without God’s presence. In Night, Wiesel exploits this allusion. Night always occurs when suffering is worst, and its presence reflects Eliezer’s belief that he lives in a world without God. The first time Eliezer mentions that “[n]ight fell” is when his father is interrupted while telling stories and informed about the deportation of Jews. Similarly, it is night when Eliezer first arrives at Birkenau/Auschwitz, and it is night—specifically “pitch darkness”—when the prisoners begin their horrible run from Buna.


MOOD

Throughout the book, the mood is intensely gloomy to the point of total tragedy. The journeys on the cattle wagons are dehumanizing, and life at the concentration camps is hideous. The prisoners are starved, tortured, and often murdered. They never know if they will be alive the next day or the next hour. Fear is ever present. Much of the book takes place in winter, which makes the mood even gloomier. Even the title of the book, Night, suggests darkness and emptiness.

Key Facts

Author  · Elie Wiesel

Genre  · World War II and Holocaust autobiography

Time and Place Written  · Mid-1950s, Paris. Wiesel began writing after a ten-year self-imposed vow of silence about the Holocaust.

Narrator  · Eliezer (a slightly fictionalized version of Elie Wiesel)

Point of View  · Eliezer speaks in the first person and always relates the autobiographical events from his perspective.

Tone  · Eliezer’s perspective is limited to his own experience, and the tone of Night is therefore intensely personal, subjective, and intimate. Night is not meant to be an all-encompassing discourse on the experience of the Holocaust; instead, it depicts the extraordinarily personal and painful experiences of a single victim.

Setting (time)  ·  19411945, during World War II

Settings (place)  · Eliezer’s story begins in Sighet, Transylvania (now part of Romania; during Wiesel’s childhood, part of Hungary). The book then follows his journey through several concentration camps in Europe: Auschwitz/Birkenau (in a part of modern-day Poland that had been annexed by Germany in 1939), Buna (a camp that was part of the Auschwitz complex), Gleiwitz (also in Poland but annexed by Germany), and Buchenwald (Germany).

Protagonist  · Eliezer

Major Conflict  · Eliezer’s struggles with Nazi persecution, and with his own faith in God and in humanity

Rising Action  · Eliezer’s journey through the various concentration camps and the subsequent deterioration of his father and himself

Climax  · The death of Eliezer’s father

Falling Action  · The liberation of the concentration camps, the time spent in silence between Eliezer’s liberation and Elie Wiesel’s decision to write about his experience, referred to in the memoir when Eliezer jumps ahead to events that happened after the Holocaust


Foreshadowing  ·  Night does not operate like a novel, using foreshadowing to hint at surprises to come. The pall of tragedy hangs over the entire novel, however. Even as early as the work’s dedication, “In memory of my parents and my little sister, Tzipora,” Wiesel makes it evident that Eliezer will be the only significant character in the book who survives the war. As readers, we are not surprised by their inevitable deaths; instead, Wiesel’s narrative shocks and stuns us with the details of the cruelty that the prisoners experience.


BACKGROUND INFORMATION - BIOGRAPHY

Elie Wiesel is probably the best known author of Jewish holocaust literature. He was born in Sighet, Romania on September 30, 1928. Named Eliezer, he was the third of four children of Shlomo Wiesel, a respected grocer, and his wife, Sarah. As a child, Elie was serious and scholarly. Fascinated with the Jewish religion, he studied the Cabbala and the Talmud.

Elie was twelve years old when the German Nazi army occupied Sighet in 1941. The soldiers immediately began to close down Jewish shops, offices, and synagogues. Soon news spread of Jewish people being arrested and sent to concentration camps. In 1944, Elie, his father, his mother, and his older sisters were arrested and deported to Auschwitz, a concentration camp in Poland. There Elie was tattooed with the number A-7713 and subjected to torture and witnessed the horrible deaths of many of his fellow Jews. After a few months, he and his father were transferred to Buna and then Buchenwald; during the journey to Buchenwald, his father grew gravely ill and died shortly after his arrival. When the Allied forces finally arrived to free the prisoners from Buchenwald in April of 1945, Elie was a shattered man, both physically and emotionally and had to be hospitalized.

After his recovery, Elie became a newspaper correspondent for a Yiddish journal, traveling throughout Europe and parts of Asia and Africa. He was also reunited with his two older sisters, Hilda and Bea, who had also survived the concentration camp. In 1947, he entered the Sorbonne University in Paris, studying literature and philosophy. To support himself, he continued his work as a correspondent and also tutored part time and served as the director of a choir. He also began to write, publishing various autobiographical essays, non-fiction articles, and short pieces of fiction.

In 1956, Wiesel moved to the United States and devoted himself full-time to his writing career and to working for humanitarian causes. With the encouragement of Francois Mauriac, a French writer who won the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wiesel decided to write about the holocaust. His first book on the subject, entitled Night, was written in Yiddish and published in 1958; it was dedicated to his parents and his younger sister, who did not survive the war. In 1960, the book was translated into English and published in America. Other non-fiction works include:
Dawn (1961)
The Accident (1962)

The Jews of Silence: A Personal Report on Soviet Jewry
Legends of Our Time (1968)
One Generation After (1970)
Souls of Fire: Portraits and Legends of Hasidic Masters
Messengers of God: Biblical Portraits and Legends (1976)
A Jew Today (1978)
(1966) (1972)
Dimensions of the Holocaust (1978)
The Testament (1981)
Five Biblical Portraits (1981)
Job, or God in the Tempest (1986)
Twilight (1988)
The Six Days of Destruction (1989)
From the Kingdom of Memory (1990)
and All Rivers Run to the Sea (1995), which is the first volume of his autobiography.




Wiesel also published several works of fiction. These include:
The Town beyond the Wall (1964)
The Gates of the Forest (1966)
A Beggar in Jerusalem (1970)
The Oath (1973)
The Fifth Son (1985)
The Forgotten (1992).


In 1963, Wiesel became an American citizen and still resides in New York. In April of 1968, he married Marion Rose, a writer, editor, and survivor of the holocaust; they had one son, Shlomo Elisha, born in 1972. From 1980 - 1986, he served as chairman of the U.S. President's Commission on the Holocaust. In 1986, he was awarded the Nobel Prize.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST

The holocaust, one of the darkest periods in history, really began in January of 1933 when Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. Believing that Aryans were superior to all others, he wanted to purge Germany of inferior races, especially the Jews. By March, Hitler had established himself as Dictator, had established his police organization known as the Gestapo, had withdrawn Germany from the League of Nations, and had established the first Nazi concentration camp at Dachau. During the spring and summer, persecution of the Jews intensified, and all Jewish government workers and university professors were fired. By July, Hitler had outlawed freedom of the press, labor unions, and all political parties except for the Nazis. In 1934, Hitler gave himself the title of Fuehrer and ordered the Gestapo to shoot or kill anyone who opposed his rule. In 1935, Hitler revoked German citizenship for all Jews and outlawed their marriage to Gentiles. In 1936, Hitler sent Nazi troops to occupy the Rhineland, next to France; it was in direct opposition to the Treaty of Versailles. He also allied himself with Italy and Japan. In 1938, Hitler seized Austria.

Throughout the 1930s, the persecution of the Jews continued. Jewish businesses were seized, synagogues were closed, property was stolen, children were banned from attending public schools, and families were forced from their homes. The Jews were usually made to move into ghetto areas. With the opening of Buchenwald in the summer of 1937, the arrests of Jews increased. By the start of 1939, Hitler had announced that his intention was to annihilate the Jewish race. He also continued his aggressive pursuit of more territory, capturing Czechoslovakia. Then in September of 1939, Hitler invaded Poland, causing the start of World War II. By the end of the year, he was operating six death camps, where large numbers of Jews and Communists were being tortured and murdered.

In 1940, Hitler captured Norway, Denmark, and France. In April, he also opened Auschwitz, a concentration camp in Poland; two and a half million prisoners would eventually be executed or die there. During the remainder of the first year of the war, Hitler opened another fifteen camps, for a total of twenty-two. Before the end of the war in 1945, more than eight million prisoners would be sent to the camps, and six million Jews would be murdered, both inside and outside the camps. At first the Nazis exterminated the Jewish people by firing squad, but later decided it was not an efficient method of death. They then developed special gas chambers to kill large groups of victims at the same time and crematoriums to burn both living and dead prisoners.

In 1941 (the year when the book began and Wiesel was twelve), the mass murder of Jews began in earnest; 170 were massacred in Bucharest and 33,000 at Babi Yar. It was also the year that Pearl Harbor was bombed and the United States entered the war. By 1942, the widespread arrest and imprisonment of Jews was occurring, (including the arrest of Moshe the Beadle). Two years later, in 1944, all the Jews in Sighet, Romania, (including the Wiesel family), were sent to concentration camps; Elie and his father were transferred from Auschwitz to Buna. The Allied army also freed Paris.

By January of 1945, the Russian army was moving on the Nazis from the East, and the Allied forces were moving from the West. Fearing that the prisoners at Buna would be liberated, the Nazis forced them to walk through the snow to Gleiwitz and then travel in open cattle cars to Buchenwald. By February, Allied troops had reached the Rhine River, and Russian troops had liberated Auschwitz. In April, Allied forces reached Dachau and Buchenwald and freed the prisoners, including Elie Wiesel. In May, Germany surrendered to the Allies, and the war and the holocaust were finally over.

Important Quotations Explained

1. Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky.Never shall I forget those flames which consumed my faith forever. Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence which deprived me, for all eternity, of the desire to live. Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust. Never shall I forget these things, even if I am condemned to live as long as God Himself. Never.

Explanation for Quotation 1

This passage, from Night’s third section, occurs just after Eliezer and his father realize they have survived the first selection at Birkenau. It is perhaps Night’s most famous passage, notable because it is one of the few moments in the memoir where Eliezer breaks out of the continuous narrative stream with which he tells his tale. As he reflects upon his horrendous first night in the concentration camp and its lasting effect on his life, Wiesel introduces the theme of Eliezer’s spiritual crisis and his loss of faith in God.

In its form, this passage resembles two significant pieces of literature: Psalm 150, from the Bible, and French author Emile Zola’s 1898 essay “J’accuse.” Psalm 150, the final prayer in the book of Psalms, is an ecstatic celebration of God. Each line begins, “Hallelujah,” or “Praise God.” Here, Wiesel constructs an inverse version of that psalm, beginning each line with a negation—“Never”—that replaces the affirmative “Hallelujah” of the original. Whereas Psalm 150 praises God, this passage questions him. As such, both the form and content of this passage reflect the inversion of Eliezer’s faith and the morality of the world around him. Everything he once believed has been turned upside down, in the same way that this passage’s words invert both the form and content of Psalm 150.

Zola’s essay “J’accuse” was a response to the Dreyfus Affair, an incident in which a Jewish army officer was unjustly convicted of treason, a judgment at least partially motivated by anti-Semitism. Zola responded by publishing an open letter in the Paris newspaper L’Aurore, denouncing the authorities who had covered up the injustice and perpetuated the persecution. Zola heightened the aggressive tone of the letter by repeatedly stressing the refrain “J’accuse” (“I accuse”).

The similarities between Wiesel’s passage and Zola’s—the French words of the refrain, the anti-Semitic context, and the defiant tone—invite comparison between the two texts. Zola’s piece was an impassioned accusation that decried injustice and anti-Semitism; Wiesel’s passage is also an impassioned polemic, but its target is God Himself. Zola’s “j’accuse” is directed at corrupt officials who have betrayed an innocent Jew; here, Eliezer’s “jamais” (“never”) is directed toward God. Carrying the comparison even further, Eliezer’s statement depicts God as a corrupt official betraying the Jews. This is a shockingly bold statement for a Jewish boy to make and reflects the profound way in which his faith has been shaken. Furthermore, the fact that Zola’s transitive verb (“I accuse”) has been replaced by an objectless adverb (“never”) reflects the prisoners’ powerlessness to remedy their situation. Although Wiesel’s passage is directed toward God, it is not directed at any specific being; since the prisoners are powerless to strike back, their anger cannot take the form of a direct confrontation.

Eliezer claims that his faith is utterly destroyed, yet at the same time says that he will never forget these things even if he “live[s] as long as God Himself.” After completely denying the existence of God, he refers to God’s existence in the final line. As mentioned before, Wiesel wrote elsewhere, “My anger rises up within faith and not outside it.” Eliezer reflects this position, which is particularly visible throughout this passage. Despite saying he has lost all faith, it is clear that Eliezer is actually struggling with his faith and his God. Just as he is never able to forget the horror of “that night,” he is never able to reject completely his heritage and his religion.

2.“Where is God? Where is He?” someone behind me asked. ..For more than half an hour [the child in the noose] stayed there, struggling between life and death, dying in slow agony under our eyes. And we had to look him full in the face. He was still alive when I passed in front of him. His tongue was still red, his eyes were not yet glazed.
Behind me, I heard the same man asking:
“Where is God now?” And I heard a voice within me answer him: “Where is He? Here He is—He is hanging here on this gallows. . . .”

Explanation for Quotation 2

This passage occurs at the end of the fourth section, as Eliezer witnesses the agonizingly slow death of the Dutch Oberkapo’s pipel, a young boy hanged for collaborating against the Nazis. This horrible moment signifies the low point of Eliezer’s faith in God. The death of the child also symbolizes the death of Eliezer’s own childhood and innocence. The suffering Eliezer sees and experiences during the Holocaust transforms his entire worldview. Before the war, he cannot imagine questioning his God. When asked by Moshe the Beadle why he prays, Eliezer replies, “Why did I pray? What a strange question. Why did I live? Why did I breathe?” Observance and belief were unquestioned parts of his core sense of identity, so once his faith is irreparably shaken, he becomes a completely different person. Among other things, Night is a perverse coming-of-age story, in which Eliezer’s innocence is cruelly stripped from him.

3. We were masters of nature, masters of the world. We had forgotten everything—death, fatigue, our natural needs. Stronger than cold or hunger, stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering, mere numbers, we were the only men on earth. At last, the morning star appeared in the gray sky. A trail of indeterminate light showed on the horizon. We were exhausted. We were without strength, without illusions.

Explanation for Quotation 3

This passage occurs in the sixth section of the book, toward the end of the prisoners’ horrible run from Buna. It succinctly describes the prisoners’ godless worldview, which holds survival to be the highest principle and all other morality to be meaningless. In Jewish prayer, God is often referred to as “Master of the Universe.” At this point, the prisoners have replaced God in that role; they themselves are the masters of nature and the world. Eliezer’s experiences have instilled in him the despairing sense that he is alone in the world, a “mere number,” responsible only for his own survival.

By omitting a conjunction between “without strength” and “without illusions” in the last sentence, Wiesel makes the relationship between the two concepts ambiguous. It is unclear whether the ideas are complementary (“We were without strength because we were without illusions”) or unrelated (“We were without strength, and also we were without illusions”). Using the former interpretation, the sentence implies that illusion—perhaps the illusion of faith—can give one strength. As we see when he discusses the death of Akiba Drumer, Eliezer acknowledges that faith gives a person a sense of being and a reason to struggle. By this point in his experience, he is deeply cynical about faith; for him, it is a mere illusion, a deluded belief in an omnipotent creator who doesn’t exist. Along similar lines, the phrase “condemned and wandering” references the entire history of Jewish suffering, a history defined by exile and exclusion. Despite his professed lack of faith, Eliezer is approaching his struggle from within the context of Judaism, not from outside it.

4. [Rabbi Eliahou’s son] had felt that his father was growing weak, he had believed that the end was near and had sought this separation in order to get rid of the burden, to free himself from an encumbrance which could lessen his own chances of survival.
I had done well to forget that. And I was glad that Rabbi Eliahou should continue to look for his beloved son.
And, in spite of myself, a prayer rose in my heart, to that God in whom I no longer believed.
My God, Lord of the Universe, give me strength never to do what Rabbi Eliahou’s son has done.

Explanation for Quotation 4

This passage is found in the sixth section, during the respite from the march to Gleiwitz. First and most obviously, it emphasizes the centrality of the father-son relationship in Eliezer’s life. As Eliezer expresses when discussing Akiba Drumer’s despair, every victim of the Holocaust needed a reason to struggle, a reason to want to survive. For many, that reason was faith in God and the ultimate goodness of mankind. But since Eliezer has lost that faith, his relationship with his father is what keeps him struggling.

Eliezer’s experience has taught him that the Nazis’ cruelty distorts one’s perspective and engenders cruelty among the prisoners. Self-preservation becomes the highest virtue in the world of the Holocaust and leads prisoners to commit horrendous crimes against one another. Eliezer fears that this loss of perspective will happen to him, that he will lose control over himself and turn against his father. In the concentration camps, Eliezer has learned that any human being, even himself, is capable of unimaginable cruelty.

Eliezer’s prayer to God reflects the incomplete nature of his loss of faith. Because Eliezer senses his potential for weakness, he appeals to a greater power for help. He says he no longer believes in God, but he nevertheless turns to God when he doubts his ability to control himself. Eliezer no longer considers himself “master of nature, master of the world,” as he did in the previous passage. Instead, he needs help controlling his base instincts.

5. One day I was able to get up, after gathering all my strength. I wanted to see myself in the mirror hanging on the opposite wall. I had not seen myself since the ghetto.
From the depths of the mirror, a corpse gazed back at me.
The look in his eyes, as they stared into mine, has never left me.

Explanation for Quotation 5

This is the final passage of Night, Eliezer’s final statement about the effect the Holocaust has had on him. As such, it reinforces the book’s deliberately limited perspective. Night does not pretend to be a comprehensive survey of World War II experiences, nor does it try to explore the general experience of Jews in concentration camps. Instead, it focuses on one specific story—Eliezer’s—to give the reader a detailed, personal account of suffering in the Holocaust. From a more traditional perspective, the ending feels incomplete. A historian or biographer would not be satisfied with this conclusion and would want to know what happened afterward—how Eliezer reunited with his family, what he did after the war, and so on. Night deliberately manipulates narrative conventions, ending where it does because it is meant to offer an intimate portrayal of Eliezer’s wartime experiences, particularly of the cruelty and suffering he experiences in the concentration camps. Other material would distract from the intensity of the experience Wiesel is trying to convey.

Eliezer implies that even though he has survived the war physically, he is essentially dead, his soul killed by the suffering he witnessed and endured. Yet, when Eliezer says, “the look in his eyes, as he stared into mine,” he implies a separation between himself and the corpse. His language, too, indicates a fundamental separation between his sense of self and his identity as a Holocaust victim—as if he has become two distinct beings. The corpse-image reminds him how much he has suffered and how much of himself—his faith in God, his innocence, his faith in mankind, his father, his mother, his sister—has been killed in the camps. At the same time, he manages to separate himself from this empty shell. The image of the corpse will always stay with him, but he has found a sense of identity that will endure beyond the Holocaust. As dark as this passage is, its message is partially hopeful. Eliezer survives beyond the horrible suffering he endured by separating himself from it, casting it aside so he can remember, but not continue to feel, the horror.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Picture

You will need your "Night" book with you in class today.


HAND IN - Night Questions Sections 6 & 7 - Due Today





CLASSWORK


I. READNight Sections 8 & 9 - Pages 109-119    Read together in class.
(What we don't finish reading in class together, you will need to finish tonight at home.)



CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. VOCABULARY#11  - "NIGHT" Words Part 2
WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 3/18/11
TEST over all 20 words - Friday 3/18/11

   1. emerged
   2. hillock
   3. timid
   4. tiers
   5. beseeching
   6. livid
   7. dysentery
   8. invalids
   9. wailing
  10. spasmodically
  11. summons
  12. conscience
  13. delirious
  14. pleaded
  15. indifference
  16. distinguish
  17. spectacle
  18. vitality
  19. disengage
  20. grimace


II.Night Section 8 & 9 Questions - Work on today in class, hand in Tuesday, March 15th

   1. How does Wiesel treat his father during the journey to Buchenwald and later during
      his dad's illness? How does Wiesel’s link to his father affect his will to survive?

   2. Given their life or death situation, do you believe Wiesel’s attitude toward his father was
           understandable? Explain your reactions

   3. Elie weeps (cries) several times in the book; explain when and why.

          Explain one time he does not weep when it would be expected.

   4.What fascinated Elie,why?

   5. Was it easy to take showers, describe?

   6. Describe how Elie's father is now, what can you say about his spirit

          and his will to live, how has it changed? Give Example

   7. What does Elie mean when he says, “ I felt that I as not

           arguing with him, but with death itself?"

   8. What was Elie ashamed of? What was he thinking about?

   9. Why didn’t his father eat anything?

   10. Describe what is happening to Elie’s father.

   11. What was the last memory of Elie’s father?

   12. What happened to Elie’s father?

   13.   Did Elie cry? Why or why not?

   14.What does he mean “free at last”?

   15. What feelings and thoughts went through your mind as you read about Wiesel’s final

              experiences as a German prisoner? What would you say if you could talk to him about
              this time in his life? What would you want him to explain to you?


*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Friday, March 11, 2011

Picture


You will need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week




CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK


I. JOURNAL #8 TITLE:  HolocaustReaction - WRITE  1 page - Due Today Friday, March 11th

Explain the significance of "Night" and the film "The Last Days." How does the film relate to the novel? Discuss the realness, the situations, events, and how it applies to your thoughts on what you just learned about the Holocaust. Do you now understand why Author and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel titles his book NIGHT?

II.Night Section 6 Questions - Work on today in class, hand in Monday March 14th

1.    What was the only thing that kept Wiesel going as they journeyed to a new camp?
2.    Why did Wiesel describe himself and the other prisoners “masters of nature, the master of the world”?
3.    Why did Wiesel and his father take turns sleeping?
4.    Who was Rabbi Eliahu? What did he ask Wiesel?
5.    After Rabbi Eliahu had journeyed on, what did Wiesel realize in relation to his question?
6.    What was Juliek worried about as the prisoners piled on top of him?
7.    What do you think Wiesel meant by this statement: “All I could hear was the violin, and
        it was as if Juliek’s soul had become his bow. He was playing his life. His whole being

          was gliding over the strings.”
8.    Once they arrived at Gleiwitz, how many days did they go without food or water?
9.    Why did Wiesel put his life at risk at the end of this section?
10.    What did the prisoners finally do to get water?


III. Night Section 7 Questions - Work on today in class, hand in Monday March 14th

1. What did they do with the dead bodies on the train?
2. What happened when workmen threw bread on the train?
3. Meir Katz groaned "Why don't theu shoot us right away?" Why do you think they didn't?


*REMINDERS:

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Thursday, March 10, 2011

Picture

You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week

HAND IN - Conspiracy Essay Questions - Rough Draft & Final Draft
and Cartoon Analysis Worksheet - Due Today



*CLASSWORK

I. Finish watching film  "The Last Days"

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Picture

CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam) - GRADE 10

The primary purpose of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) is to significantly improve pupil achievement in public high schools and to ensure that pupils who graduate from public high schools can demonstrate grade level competency in reading, writing, and mathematics.


Tuesday, March 8, 2011

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CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam) - GRADE 10


The primary purpose of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) is to significantly improve pupil achievement in public high schools and to ensure that pupils who graduate from public high schools can demonstrate grade level competency in reading, writing, and mathematics.


Monday, March 7, 2011

Picture

You will need your "Night" book with you in class today.


No Vocabulary this week!






CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. READNight Sections 6 & 7- Pages 91-108    Read together in class.
(What we don't finish reading in class together, you will need to finish tonight at home.)


*HOMEWORK

I. Conspiracy Essay Questions - Rough Draft & Final Draft Due Thursday March 10th

WRITE   2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion) 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.) (Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial font only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper)

II.Cartoon Analysis Worksheet - Due Thursday March 10th (see examples listed under Wed. March 2nd)


*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Friday, March 4, 2011

Picture


You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week!







*CLASSWORK

I. Begin watching film  "The Last Days"

The Last Days presents four distinct perspectives on the holocaust.

First, the survivors tell of their life before the holocaust: life in a regular town, living a regular life. They tell of how that changed, usually by insidious degrees as opposed to all at one moment. It is horrifying to see how it happened, how it started. The Nazi's suppression was so subtle at first, gradually becoming more harsh, and yet seemingly not that far out of the ordinary, at least not as much so as what was to follow. You can see how it could happen to anybody. People didn't think to run. This is the first perspective.

The second perspective is of the survivors talking about their experiences in interviews, the horrors they saw, the last time they saw they their families, the way people were executed by a perfectly efficient system. They tell how they swallowed jewels to keep them safe. The survivors recount their stories from memory.

The third perspective is the most unusual: the survivors actually visiting the ruins of the camp they had witnessed such horror in, lived in for a period of months. They walk over to a decrepit foundation of a building and say "This was the latrine," and then tell how they performed a ceremony in there. You get to see the places where the attrocities happened, which you may have seen before, but this time you have a guide who was actually there. This is not a history lesson, but a personal narrative.

There is actually a fourth perspective too: a Nazi doctor from Auschwitz, who is interviewed both by one of the documentarians and also by one of the survivors. You get to hear the survivor's perspective on the Nazi doctor's account of events at the camp.

An extremely well rounded story, which will help you understand on an emotional level what was going on.

*HOMEWORK

I. Conspiracy Essay Questions - Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th

WRITE   2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion) 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.(Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial font only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper)

II. Cartoon Analysis Worksheet - Due Thursday 3/10/11 (see examples listed under Wed. March 2nd)

Project: Cartoon-Truth or Tale

Click on the link below to print a copy
of the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet"

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/cartoon.html

Create your own cartoon depicting a message of propaganda relating to
Racismand that parallels [to some degree] with what was happening in the
world during the late 30's and 1940s. You can depict the race of your choice
(including your own) in a demeaning way or make your own anti-Nazi propaganda.

Fill in the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet," answering the following questions.

1) Describe the action taking place in the cartoon.
2) Explain how the words in the cartoon clarify the symbols.
3) Explain the message of the cartoon.
4) What special interest groups would agree disagree with the cartoon's message?

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Thursday, March 3, 2011

Picture

You will need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week!





*CLASSWORK

I. JOURNAL #7 TITLE:  Exodus- WRITE  1 page - Due Thursday, March 3rd - Today!

It has been said that “That which does not kill us, makes us stronger.”  Does this apply to Weisel? Are you surprised that he has survived the hardships so far? Is he better prepared for them in some way, than the average person? What happens if one day the comfortable life that you know is suddenly taken away because of your race. Like many young Jews at the beginning of World War II, your country is now engaged in a war with a dictator. For Jewish teens in the 1940's, the war was far away and at first, they did not think that their life would ever be effected. But it was--forever. If you were put in the same circumstances, what would you do? If you only had 20 minutes to pack up your things and vacate the premises, what would you take with you? Do you think you could survive such hardships? Why or why not? What changes would it make in you? Please give a detailed explanation of how you would have handled some of the same experiences that Eliezer "Elie" Wesel had.


II. On the back side of Journal #7, identify three examples of foreshadowingthree examples of personification as well as five examples of symbolism from the first four sections of the book Night.
Please list the page numbers where each literary device is found. - Due Thursday, March 3rd - Today!


III. REVIEW

Preparing for the California High School Exit Exam Workbook  - Chapter 3 - Page 30 (If time permits)


*HOMEWORK

I. Conspiracy Essay Questions - Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th

WRITE   2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion) 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.) (Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial font only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper)

II. Cartoon Analysis Worksheet - Due Thursday 3/10/11 (see examples listed under Wed. March 2nd)

Project: Cartoon-Truth or Tale

Click on the link below to print a copy
of the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet"

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/cartoon.html

Create your own cartoon depicting a message of propaganda relating to
Racismand that parallels [to some degree] with what was happening in the
world during the late 30's and 1940s. You can depict the race of your choice
(including your own) in a demeaning way or make your own anti-Nazi propaganda.

Fill in the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet," answering the following questions.

1) Describe the action taking place in the cartoon.
2) Explain how the words in the cartoon clarify the symbols.
3) Explain the message of the cartoon.
4) What special interest groups would agree disagree with the cartoon's message?

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Picture



You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week!





*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. Review "Conspiracy" Objectives and Essay Questions


    * You should understand the importance of the Wannsee Conference
        and how it fits into the larger pattern of persecution of the  
Jews in Germany prior to 1942.

    * You will be able to analyze the purpose and nature of the decisions made at the
        Wannsee Conference and grasp the change in  Nazi policy this represented.

    * You will understand the investment of resources and coordination required by the
        Nazis in implementing this plan that involved 
the cooperation of all government agencies.

    * You will know the amount of territory controlled or occupied by the Nazis by
        1942 and understand the significance of this in 
the execution of the "Final Solution." 


Essay Questions - Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th
(Write one paragraph answers for each question. See instructions below for details.)

1) How does this careful investigation of the meeting of Nazi leaders in 1942 change
 your understanding of the Holocaust and the people who made it happen?" 

2) Is it really possible for a secret group of powerful people to
  influence historical, political and/or social events?”  

3) Do people tend to not be concerned with or simplify the truth because they instead, prefer to
 reside in their very own unreality where everything functions according to their social agreements? 

4) Do you believe that in order to reform society, individuals need to be an active part of it and change it from within? Or must they hide inside of society or externally rebel against it in order for things to change? 

WRITE 2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion) 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.) (Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial font only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper) Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th


*HOMEWORK

Cartoon Analysis Worksheet - Due Thurday 3/10/11

Project: Cartoon-Truth or Tale

Click on the link below to print a copy
of the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet"

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets/cartoon.html

Create your own cartoon depicting a message of propaganda relating to
Racism and that parallels [to some degree] with what was happening in the
world during the late 30's and 1940s. You can depict the race of your choice
(including your own) in a demeaning way or make your own anti-Nazi
propaganda (See examples below)

Fill in the "Cartoon Analysis Work Sheet," answering the following questions.

1) Describe the action taking place in the cartoon.
2) Explain how the words in the cartoon clarify the symbols.
3) Explain the message of the cartoon.
4) What special interest groups would agree disagree with the cartoon's message?

*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


                        Propaganda Posters




Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Picture

You will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week!





*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. Finish watching the film  "Conspiracy"

Objectives

    * You should understand the importance of the Wannsee Conference
        and how it fits into the larger pattern of persecution of the  
Jews in Germany prior to 1942.

    * You will be able to analyze the purpose and nature of the decisions made at the
        Wannsee Conference and grasp the change in  Nazi policy this represented.

    * You will understand the investment of resources and coordination required by the
        Nazis in implementing this plan that involved 
the cooperation of all government agencies.

    * You will know the amount of territory controlled or occupied by the Nazis by
        1942 and understand the significance of this in 
the execution of the "Final Solution." 



Essay Questions - Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th
(Write one paragraph answers for each question. See instructions below for details.)

1) How does this careful investigation of the meeting of Nazi leaders in 1942 change
 your understanding of the Holocaust and the people who made it happen?" 

2) Is it really possible for a secret group of powerful people to
  influence historical, political and/or social events?”  

3) Do people tend to not be concerned with or simplify the truth because they instead, prefer to
 reside in their very own unreality where everything functions according to their social agreements? 

4) Do you believe that in order to reform society, individuals need to be an active part of it and change it from within? Or must they hide inside of society or externally rebel against it in order for things to change? 


WRITE 2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion) 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.) (Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper) Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th, Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th


*HOMEWORK

Night Questions Section 5, pages 73-90  - DUE Wed. March 2, 2011

1. What did the men do on the eve of Rosh Hashana? 
2. How did Elie feel while the others were praying? 
3. What was Elie's decision about fasting on Yom Kippur? Why did he make that decision? 
4. What was Elie's "inheritance" from his father? Why was his father giving it to him? 
5. Did the men remember to say the Kaddish for Akiba Drumer? 
6. What did Elie dream of when he dreamed of a better world? 
7. What happened to the patients who stayed in the hospital instead of being evacuated? 
8. What was the last thing the head of the block ordered the men to do before they evacuated?  Why? 
9. What was the weather like during the evacuation? 


*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Monday, February 28, 2011

Picture


You
will not need your "Night" book with you in class today.

No Vocabulary this week!





*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. Begin watching film  "Conspiracy"

*On January 20, 1942, 15 high-ranking Nazi party and German government leaders met under the leadership of SS Lieutenant General Reinhard Heydrich at a lakeside villa in the wealthy Wannsee district of Berlin. Heydrich called the meeting on the basis of an order instructing him to coordinate logistics for carrying out "the final solution of the Jewish question." By seeing recreated scenes as portrayed in the HBO film “Conspiracy,” you will learn that German government officials discussed "extermination" without hesitation or qualm and thereby sanctioned, coordinated and expanded the implementation of the mass murder of all European Jews.

Objectives

    * You should understand the importance of the Wannsee Conference
        and how it fits into the larger pattern of persecution of the  
Jews in Germany prior to 1942.

    * You will be able to analyze the purpose and nature of the decisions made at the
        Wannsee Conference and grasp the change in  Nazi policy this represented.

    * You will understand the investment of resources and coordination required by the
        Nazis in implementing this plan that involved 
the cooperation of all government agencies.

    * You will know the amount of territory controlled or occupied by the Nazis by
        1942 and understand the significance of this in 
the execution of the "Final Solution." 


Essay Questions - Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th ,Final Draft Due Thurs. March 10th
(Write one paragraph answers for each question. See instructions below for details.)

1) How does this careful investigation of the meeting of Nazi leaders in 1942 change
 your understanding of the Holocaust and the people who made it happen?" 


2) Is it really possible for a secret group of powerful people to
  influence historical, political and/or social events?”  


3) Do people tend to not be concerned with or simplify the truth because they instead, prefer to
 reside in their very own unreality where everything functions according to their social agreements? 


4) Do you believe that in order to reform society, individuals need to be an active part of it and change it from within? Or must they hide inside of society or externally rebel against it in order for things to change? 

WRITE 2 Full Pages, addressing all four questions. (Compose a 5 Paragraph essay. 4 or 5 sentences per. paragraph.
The 5th paragraph should be your Conclusion(Typed, double spaced, #12 font Times New Roman or Arial only, 1"  margins on right/left hand sides of paper) Rough Draft Due Fri. March 4th , Final DraftDue Thurs. March 10th


*HOMEWORK

Night Questions Section 5, pages 73-90  - DUE Wed. March 2, 2011

1. What did the men do on the eve of Rosh Hashana? 
2. How did Elie feel while the others were praying? 
3. What was Elie's decision about fasting on Yom Kippur? Why did he make that decision? 
4. What was Elie's "inheritance" from his father? Why was his father giving it to him? 
5. Did the men remember to say the Kaddish for Akiba Drumer? 
6. What did Elie dream of when he dreamed of a better world? 
7. What happened to the patients who stayed in the hospital instead of being evacuated? 
8. What was the last thing the head of the block ordered the men to do before they evacuated?  Why? 
9. What was the weather like during the evacuation? 


*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Friday, February 25, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today, Friday 2/25

* Hand In NIGHT Questions - Section 4, Journals 3, 4, 5 & 6
   and Vocabulary #10 sentences




*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK


I. Take Vocabulary #10 Quiz 


II. After Quiz, please READ together in class "Night" Section 5  Pages 73 - 90
(What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)


*HOMEWORK

No weekend homework


*REMINDERS:

Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html





Thursday, February 24, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today,Thursday 2/24

* HAND IN Night Questions 1 -11 sections 2 & 3 Pages 32-54 -DUE today, Thurs. 2/24/

* Get Journals 3, 4 & 5 Stamped! Remember, you will be turning in "Night"
   Journals 3, 4, 5  & 6 on Friday 2/25


*CLASSWORK/HOMEWORK

I. READ NIGHT- Section 4 - Pages 55-72
(What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

II. JOURNAL #6 TITLE:  _______ - WRITE  1/2  page - Due Friday 2/25! - SEE HANDOUT

The written 1/2 page entry/sketch log  should focus on your response to the literature, and should not merely be a summary of section 4. Your journal should include comments about your thoughts and feelings while reading, any questions you have, and predictions about the next chapter.

*HOMEWORK

I. NIGHT Questions - Section 4 - Pages 55-72 - Due Friday 2/25

1. Describe Elie's encounter with the dentist.

2. What did Elie Wiesel do when Idek hit his father? What was he thinking?

3. Who took Elie's gold tooth? Why did Elie give it up?

4. What were the only things in which Elie took an interest?

5. How did Elie describe the men after the air raid?

6. What happened to the young man from Warsaw? Why?

7. How did Elie say the soup tasted the night the pipel (young servant boy) was hanged?


II. VOCABULARY#10  - "NIGHT" Words (See Tue. Feb 22nd for list of words and definitions)

WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 2/25/11

STUDY for Friday's Quiz over all 20 words - Friday 2/25/11


*REMINDERS:

You will need your "Night" book with you in class on Friday 2/25

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today,Wednesday 2/23







*CLASSWORK

I. REVIEW NIGHT- Sections 2, 3 - Pages 32-54

II. JOURNAL #5 TITLE:  Deportation - WRITE  1/2  page - Due Today! - BASED ON FILM

Your Written Entry should focus on your response to the film, and should not merely be a summary of what you watched. You should include comments about your thoughts and feelings while viewing the movie, any questions you have, and predictions about the next scene.

*HOMEWORK

I. Night Questions 1 -11 from sections 2 & 3 (See Tue 2/22/ for questions)  Pages 21-43 -DUE THURS 2/24/

II. VOCABULARY#10  - "NIGHT" Words
WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 2/25/11
TEST over all 20 words - Friday 2/25/11


*REMINDERS:

Bring "Night" book with you to class on Thursday 2/24

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html




Tuesday, February 22, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today,Tuesday 2/22

* Get Homework, JOURNAL #3
   TITLE:  Holocaust STAMPED! - Due Today





*CLASSWORK

I. REVIEW

Preparing for the California High School Exit Exam Workbook  - Chapter 2 - Pages 23- 29

II. READ NIGHT - Sections 2, 3 - Pages 32-54
(What we don't finish reading in class together today, you will need to finish tonight at home.)

III. JOURNAL #4TITLE:  Auschwitz - WRITE  1/2  page for each chapter (2 & 3) DUE THURSDAY 2/24/11

A. Chapters 2 & 3  journal and sketch Log - Must complete at least half the journal in class -
GET STAMPED TODAY!  Keep "Night" Journals 3, 4, 5 & 6 until Friday 2/25 at which time
you will turn them all in.

Create a title for chapters 2 & 3  based on what happened in each of these chapters. Also date each entry.
Sketch memorable scenes from the chapters. Even if you do not consider yourself a good artist, try to make some sketches. Use colors that remind you of the mood of the story.

The written entries should focus on your response to the literature, and should not merely be chapter summaries. They should include comments about your thoughts and feelings while reading, any questions you have, and predictions about the next chapter.

Write 1/2 page for each entry (Chapters 2 & 3) Choose one important sentence from the book.  Copy it word for word in the space provided.  Include the page number.

Format your paper as shown below:


Date:

Chapter Title:

Illustration of one scene from the chapter:
Quote, page#:



Written response to chapter:

*HOMEWORK

I. Night Questions sections 2 & 3  Pages 21-43

Answer Questions 1-11 DUE THURSDAY 2/24/11

1. To what did Wiesel compare the world?
2. What did Madame Schächter see in her vision?
3. How did the other people in the car react to Madame Schächter?
4. Where did the train stop?
5. What did the Jews in the train car discover when they looked out the window?
6. When did Wiesel say the travelers left their illusions behind?
7. Which notorious SS officer did they meet at Auschwitz?
8. What was Elie's main thought as the men and women were being herded from the train?
9. What prayer were the people saying? Why was it unusual?
10. What did Elie do when the gypsy struck his father? Why? What was his father's response?
11. How long were Elie and his father at Auschwitz?


II. VOCABULARY#10  - "NIGHT" Words
WRITE one sentence for each word - DUE Friday 2/25/11
TEST over all 20 words - Friday 2/25/11

1.    surname (n): a last name

2.    synagogue (n): a Jewish house of worship

3.    encumbered (adj): burdened; inconvenienced; bothered; annoyed

4.    insignificant (adj): unimportant

5.    waif (n): a person without a home

6.    profoundly (adv): deeply

7.    unsentimental (adj): tough-minded; determined

8.    Gestapo (n): the secret police force of Nazi Germany

9.    lorries (n): motor trucks

10.    betrothals (n): engagements

11.    diplomacy (n): word for relationship between nations

12.    weary (adj): tired; exhausted; fatigued

13.    liquidate (v): to get rid of; to put an end to

14.    Fascism (n): German government during WWII.

15.    antisemitism (n): discrimination against Jews.

16.    billet (v): to provide housing for a soldier

17.    bade (v): commanded (past tense of bid)

18.    decrees (n): orders

19.    ghettos (n): section of a city where Jews were forced to live

20.    anguish (n): pain; suffering; distress

*REMINDERS:


Bring "Night" book with you to class on Wednesday 2/23

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html

Monday, February 21, 2011 - SCHOOL HOLIDAY

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Presidents Day


Friday, February 18, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today, Friday 2/18

* No Vocabulary this week

* HAND IN - NIGHT - Chapter 1 Questions - Due Today




*CLASSWORK

I. Discuss Extra Credit Book Report(40 Points) Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
Anyone interested in reading the following graphic novel(s) for Extra Credit, please see me - Mr. Marzo

The Complete Maus: A Survivor's Tale by Art Spiegelman (ISBN# 0679406417)    OR

A People's History of American Empire by Howard Zinn (ISBN# 0805087443)


II. JOURNAL #3TITLE:  Holocaust - WRITE  1/2  page Must be completed TODAY! - GET STAMPED!

Respond to the following prompts on your own sheet of line paper:

A. Describe in detail everything you already know about the Holocaust.  Consider who was involved, where it took place, and as many events as you can recall from our class discussion and what you have learned in your history class.

B. Sketch 2 symbols/illustrations that depict what happened to the people during the Holocaust.

C. Chapter journal and sketch Log - Must be completed TODAY! - GET STAMPED!

For this novel, "NIGHT", you will be asked to keep a sketchbook- journal. This is a combination of sketches about and written responses to the story. You will be required to make an entry for each chapter in the novel.

Create a title for each chapter based on what happened in the chapter. Also date each entry.
Sketch memorable scenes from the chapters. Even if you do not consider yourself a good artist, try to make some sketches. Use colors that remind you of the mood of the story.

The written entries should focus on your response to the literature, and should not merely be chapter summaries. They should include comments about your thoughts and feelings while reading, any questions you have, and predictions about the next chapter. Try to write at least one page for each entry.  Choose one important sentence from the book.  Copy it word for word in the space provided.  Include the page number.

Format your paper as shown below:
____________________________________________________________________________


Date:
Chapter Title:

Illustration of one scene from the chapter:

Quote, page#:


Written response to chapter:


____________________________________________________________________________

*HOMEWORK


Homework - JOURNAL #3- parts A, B & C - Due Tuesday 2/22


*REMINDERS:

Bring "Night" book with you to class on Tuesday 2/22

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html

Thursday, February 17, 2011

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* Bring your "Night" book with you to class today, Thursday 2/17

* No Vocabulary this week

* HAND IN Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Notes - DUE TODAY!





*CLASSWORK

I.Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Test - TODAY!  - Multiple Choice Test - Scantron
    (Theseus, Sigurd, Tale of Sir Launcelot & Sword in the Stone)


II. READ NIGHT- Chapter 1 (Pages 1 - 20)
(Read together in class. What we don't finish  in class, please finish reading at home.)



*HOMEWORK

I. NIGHT - Chapter 1 Questions - Due Friday 2/18


1. Describe Moshe the Beadle.

2. Describe Elie Wiesel's father. What was his occupation?

3. Why was Moshe the Beadle important to Elie Wiesel?

4. Summarize the story Moshe the Beadle told on his return from being deported.
     Why did he say he had returned to Sighet?

5. What was the public reaction to Moshe's story?

6. What was the setting and the year for the first section of the book? What was
      the world condition at the time?

7. Describe, in order, the events that happened from the last day of Passover until Pentecost.

8. How did Wiesel say he felt about the Hungarian police?

9. Who was Martha? What happened when she visited the Wiesel family in the ghetto?


*REMINDERS:

Bring "Night" book with you to class on Friday 2/18

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html


Wednesday, February 16, 2011

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* You will not need your "Literature Book" today

* No Vocabulary this week

* HAND IN - Modern Monster (Story & picture) - from Lit. Book Pg 687 - DUE TODAY
 



*CLASSWORK


I. REVIEW Greek Myths -"Theseus" Pages 663-669 from Literature Book. "TAKE NOTES"

Theseus Notes (Copy)

* Theseus grows up with his mother in southern Greece

* Theseus proves that he is ready to see his father when he lifts the stone and takes the sword

* Theseus is given a poisoned drink because Medea wants Aegeus in her power
    without outside interference.

* Every nine years seven maidens and seven youths had to be sent to Crete, to be
    offered up as sacrifice by going through the Minotaur’s (part man & part bull) Labyrinth

* Theseus is able to escape the Labyrinth because Ariadne gives him a ball of string

* After professing his love for her, Theseus leaves Ariadne on the island of Naxos (Dia)

* On returning to Athens Theseus forgets to switch the black sail with the white one. Aegeus, his father, believes his son is dead and hurls himself off a cliff and into the sea, named the 'Aegean ' after him.

* The greatest differences between Greek & Norse mythology are as follows:

          A) The Greek Gods will always remain on Mount Olympus, ruling over the earth.
                Norse mythology, in contrast, had a definitive end of the world - Ragnarok.

           B) The Greek gods were more joyful and happy compared to the dark and gloomy Norse gods.

           C) Many of the Greek heroes (but not always) were common everyday people were as
                 Norse & British heroes were usually of royal decent.


II. REVIEW

Preparing for the California High School Exit Exam Workbook  - Chapter 1 - Pages 13 - 21


*HOMEWORK

II. Study Notes for Thursday's 2/17 Quiz over
Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore
(Theseus, Sigurd, Tale of Sir Launcelot & Sword in the Stone)


*REMINDERS:

Bring "Night" book with you to class on Thursday 2/17

Greek,Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Quiz Thursday 2/17

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html



Tuesday, February 15, 2011

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* You will not need your "Literature Book" today

* No Vocabulary this week





*CLASSWORK

I. Writers Craft: Prepositions - Read Pages 652 - 654    
     Answer Questions Concept Check Page 656 #1-10 & Page 656 Page 1-15 - DUE TODAY!

II.
Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Notes
Continue copying notes from whiteboard - Quiz Thursday's 2/17

*HOMEWORK

I. Modern Monster Project - 24 Points - Lit. Book Pg 687, Writing
   Due Wednesday 2/16/2011 (See instructions posted on this page under
Friday, February 11, 2011)

II. Study for Thursday's 2/17 Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Quiz

*REMINDERS:

Bring "Night" book with you to class on Thursady 2/17


Greek, Norse & British Myths, Legends & Folklore Quiz Thursday 2/17

* Book Report #3Due Tuesday April 5, 2011 
(See instructions under the BOOK REPORTS TAB for details) 

http://abcusdcerritoshsmarzo2.weebly.com/book‐reports.html